Upon the Imprisonment of His Sacred Majesty

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Upon the Imprisonment of His Sacred Majesty

Poem 13

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Line number 7

 Physical note

short horizontal lines above first and last words in line; less space above this line than between other stanzas
Line number 15

 Physical note

“ſ” written over earlier letter, possibly “t”
Line number 17

 Physical note

written in hand H2
Line number 18

 Physical note

after poem ends at bottom of page, reverse is blank
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
Upon the impriſonment of his Sacred Majestie that unparalel’d Prince King Charles the ffirst.
Upon the Imprisonment of his Sacred Majesty, That Unparalleled Prince, King
Critical Note
Charles was King of England (1625-1649) during the civil war, and was jailed, in 1647, by the opposition Parliament.
Charles the First
Upon the Imprisonment of his Sacred Majesty, That Unparalleled Prince, King Charles the First
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
This bloodthirsty portrayal of the war-time captivity of Charles I (apparently written before his assassination) faintly echoes the elegiac refrain of “Tell me no more” from Poem 11, here in the form of a repeated injunction to an unspecified addressee to “ask ... no more” why the speaker laments: which should, she implies, be perfectly obvious. The context for these similar refrains could hardly differ more: instead of grieving her daughter’s untimely passing (as in Poem 11), the speaker invokes the goddess of vengeance to bring hellish torment upon the king’s and kingdom’s captors and usurpers (who are portrayed as hypocritical, grasping, impious, and corrupt). The speaker also prays—apparently still with Nemesis as her deity of choice—for the king’s “Job-like” resurrection, an apt model for a king the speaker sees as “Sacred.” The meter is unusual for Pulter, with triplets of iambic pentameter replacing her more usual couplets, as though the enormity of the subject calls out for a form that exceeds the norm. Pulter only uses the same meter in Poem 16 (“The Revolution”) and Poem 55 (“Must I thus ever interdicted be”), while Poem 66 offers a variation.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
Why I Sit Sighing here aſk mee noe more
Why I sit sighing here, ask me no more;
2
My Sacred Soveraigns thraldom I deplore
My sacred sovereign’s thralldom I deplore.
3
Just Nemeſis (whom they pretend to Adore)
Just
Gloss Note
Greek goddess of revenge
Nemesis
(whom they pretend to adore),
4
Put on thy Sable blood-beſprinkled Gown
Put on thy sable blood-besprinkled gown,
5
And thy or’eflowing Vengeance thunder Down
And thy o’erflowing vengeance thunder down
6
On theſe Uſurpers of our Caeſars Crown
On these usurpers of our
Critical Note
Roman emperor, figurative frequently for Charles I
Caesar’s
crown.


7
Physical Note
short horizontal lines above first and last words in line; less space above this line than between other stanzas
They have his Sacred Perſon now in hold
They have his sacred person now in hold;
8
They haue their King, and Countrey, bought & Sould
They have their king, and country, bought and sold,
9
And hope of Glory, all for Curſed Gold
And hope of glory, all for curséd gold.
10
Then Seeing they Eternity thus Sleight
Then, seeing they Eternity thus slight,
11
Let Acherons fierce Ishew them afright
Let
Critical Note
In Greek myth, Acheron is a river in Hades; the personification here may suggest identification with Hades, god of the underworld.
Acheron’s
fierce issue them affright
12
Till endles horrour doth their Souls benight
Till endless horror doth their souls benight.
13
Then let our Job like Saint riſe from ye Ground
Then let our
Critical Note
Job is a biblical figure renowned for extraordinary patience in the face of extreme difficulties.
Job-like
saint rise from the ground,
14
ffor Piety and Patience Soe renow’nd
For piety and patience so renowned,
15
That for the
Physical Note
“ſ” written over earlier letter, possibly “t”
beſt
of kings hee may be Crownd
That for the best of kings he may be crowned.
16
Then aſk noe more why I’m in tears diſſolv’d
Then ask no more why I’m in tears dissolved,
17
Whilst our good king with \
Physical Note
written in hand H2
ſorrow\
is involv’d
Whilst our good king with sorrow is
Gloss Note
entangled, enveloped
involved
:
18
To pray and weep for him I am
Physical Note
after poem ends at bottom of page, reverse is blank
resolvd
.
To pray and weep for him I am
Critical Note
convinced; melted; dissolved; brought to a clear conclusion
resolved
.
curled line
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition
Title note

 Critical note

Charles was King of England (1625-1649) during the civil war, and was jailed, in 1647, by the opposition Parliament.

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

This bloodthirsty portrayal of the war-time captivity of Charles I (apparently written before his assassination) faintly echoes the elegiac refrain of “Tell me no more” from Poem 11, here in the form of a repeated injunction to an unspecified addressee to “ask ... no more” why the speaker laments: which should, she implies, be perfectly obvious. The context for these similar refrains could hardly differ more: instead of grieving her daughter’s untimely passing (as in Poem 11), the speaker invokes the goddess of vengeance to bring hellish torment upon the king’s and kingdom’s captors and usurpers (who are portrayed as hypocritical, grasping, impious, and corrupt). The speaker also prays—apparently still with Nemesis as her deity of choice—for the king’s “Job-like” resurrection, an apt model for a king the speaker sees as “Sacred.” The meter is unusual for Pulter, with triplets of iambic pentameter replacing her more usual couplets, as though the enormity of the subject calls out for a form that exceeds the norm. Pulter only uses the same meter in Poem 16 (“The Revolution”) and Poem 55 (“Must I thus ever interdicted be”), while Poem 66 offers a variation.
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Greek goddess of revenge
Line number 6

 Critical note

Roman emperor, figurative frequently for Charles I
Line number 11

 Critical note

In Greek myth, Acheron is a river in Hades; the personification here may suggest identification with Hades, god of the underworld.
Line number 13

 Critical note

Job is a biblical figure renowned for extraordinary patience in the face of extreme difficulties.
Line number 17

 Gloss note

entangled, enveloped
Line number 18

 Critical note

convinced; melted; dissolved; brought to a clear conclusion
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
Upon the impriſonment of his Sacred Majestie that unparalel’d Prince King Charles the ffirst.
Upon the Imprisonment of his Sacred Majesty, That Unparalleled Prince, King
Critical Note
Charles was King of England (1625-1649) during the civil war, and was jailed, in 1647, by the opposition Parliament.
Charles the First
Upon the Imprisonment of his Sacred Majesty, That Unparalleled Prince, King Charles the First
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
This bloodthirsty portrayal of the war-time captivity of Charles I (apparently written before his assassination) faintly echoes the elegiac refrain of “Tell me no more” from Poem 11, here in the form of a repeated injunction to an unspecified addressee to “ask ... no more” why the speaker laments: which should, she implies, be perfectly obvious. The context for these similar refrains could hardly differ more: instead of grieving her daughter’s untimely passing (as in Poem 11), the speaker invokes the goddess of vengeance to bring hellish torment upon the king’s and kingdom’s captors and usurpers (who are portrayed as hypocritical, grasping, impious, and corrupt). The speaker also prays—apparently still with Nemesis as her deity of choice—for the king’s “Job-like” resurrection, an apt model for a king the speaker sees as “Sacred.” The meter is unusual for Pulter, with triplets of iambic pentameter replacing her more usual couplets, as though the enormity of the subject calls out for a form that exceeds the norm. Pulter only uses the same meter in Poem 16 (“The Revolution”) and Poem 55 (“Must I thus ever interdicted be”), while Poem 66 offers a variation.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
Why I Sit Sighing here aſk mee noe more
Why I sit sighing here, ask me no more;
2
My Sacred Soveraigns thraldom I deplore
My sacred sovereign’s thralldom I deplore.
3
Just Nemeſis (whom they pretend to Adore)
Just
Gloss Note
Greek goddess of revenge
Nemesis
(whom they pretend to adore),
4
Put on thy Sable blood-beſprinkled Gown
Put on thy sable blood-besprinkled gown,
5
And thy or’eflowing Vengeance thunder Down
And thy o’erflowing vengeance thunder down
6
On theſe Uſurpers of our Caeſars Crown
On these usurpers of our
Critical Note
Roman emperor, figurative frequently for Charles I
Caesar’s
crown.


7
Physical Note
short horizontal lines above first and last words in line; less space above this line than between other stanzas
They have his Sacred Perſon now in hold
They have his sacred person now in hold;
8
They haue their King, and Countrey, bought & Sould
They have their king, and country, bought and sold,
9
And hope of Glory, all for Curſed Gold
And hope of glory, all for curséd gold.
10
Then Seeing they Eternity thus Sleight
Then, seeing they Eternity thus slight,
11
Let Acherons fierce Ishew them afright
Let
Critical Note
In Greek myth, Acheron is a river in Hades; the personification here may suggest identification with Hades, god of the underworld.
Acheron’s
fierce issue them affright
12
Till endles horrour doth their Souls benight
Till endless horror doth their souls benight.
13
Then let our Job like Saint riſe from ye Ground
Then let our
Critical Note
Job is a biblical figure renowned for extraordinary patience in the face of extreme difficulties.
Job-like
saint rise from the ground,
14
ffor Piety and Patience Soe renow’nd
For piety and patience so renowned,
15
That for the
Physical Note
“ſ” written over earlier letter, possibly “t”
beſt
of kings hee may be Crownd
That for the best of kings he may be crowned.
16
Then aſk noe more why I’m in tears diſſolv’d
Then ask no more why I’m in tears dissolved,
17
Whilst our good king with \
Physical Note
written in hand H2
ſorrow\
is involv’d
Whilst our good king with sorrow is
Gloss Note
entangled, enveloped
involved
:
18
To pray and weep for him I am
Physical Note
after poem ends at bottom of page, reverse is blank
resolvd
.
To pray and weep for him I am
Critical Note
convinced; melted; dissolved; brought to a clear conclusion
resolved
.
curled line
X (Close panel) All Notes
Elemental Edition
Title note

 Critical note

Charles was King of England (1625-1649) during the civil war, and was jailed, in 1647, by the opposition Parliament.
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Elemental Edition

 Headnote

This bloodthirsty portrayal of the war-time captivity of Charles I (apparently written before his assassination) faintly echoes the elegiac refrain of “Tell me no more” from Poem 11, here in the form of a repeated injunction to an unspecified addressee to “ask ... no more” why the speaker laments: which should, she implies, be perfectly obvious. The context for these similar refrains could hardly differ more: instead of grieving her daughter’s untimely passing (as in Poem 11), the speaker invokes the goddess of vengeance to bring hellish torment upon the king’s and kingdom’s captors and usurpers (who are portrayed as hypocritical, grasping, impious, and corrupt). The speaker also prays—apparently still with Nemesis as her deity of choice—for the king’s “Job-like” resurrection, an apt model for a king the speaker sees as “Sacred.” The meter is unusual for Pulter, with triplets of iambic pentameter replacing her more usual couplets, as though the enormity of the subject calls out for a form that exceeds the norm. Pulter only uses the same meter in Poem 16 (“The Revolution”) and Poem 55 (“Must I thus ever interdicted be”), while Poem 66 offers a variation.
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Greek goddess of revenge
Elemental Edition
Line number 6

 Critical note

Roman emperor, figurative frequently for Charles I
Transcription
Line number 7

 Physical note

short horizontal lines above first and last words in line; less space above this line than between other stanzas
Elemental Edition
Line number 11

 Critical note

In Greek myth, Acheron is a river in Hades; the personification here may suggest identification with Hades, god of the underworld.
Elemental Edition
Line number 13

 Critical note

Job is a biblical figure renowned for extraordinary patience in the face of extreme difficulties.
Transcription
Line number 15

 Physical note

“ſ” written over earlier letter, possibly “t”
Transcription
Line number 17

 Physical note

written in hand H2
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

entangled, enveloped
Transcription
Line number 18

 Physical note

after poem ends at bottom of page, reverse is blank
Elemental Edition
Line number 18

 Critical note

convinced; melted; dissolved; brought to a clear conclusion
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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