This Ugly Sow (Emblem 30)

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This Ugly Sow (Emblem 30)

Poem 95

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
  • Website designed by Sergei Kalugin, Northwestern University
  • IT project consultation by Josh Honn, Northwestern University
  • Project sponsored by Northwestern University, Brock University, and University of Leeds
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Line number 15

 Physical note

“s” written over another letter
Line number 24

 Physical note

caret inverted
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Transcription
Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 30]
This Ugly Sow
(Emblem 30)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Pigs, boars, and hogs do not fare well in Pulter’s moral zoo. As in Mark But Those Hogs (Emblem 34) [Poem 99] where grunting, earth-bound pigs are unfavorably compared to heavenly turtledoves, Pulter here contrasts the filth of pigs to the purity of ermines. Citing proverbial, biblical, and mythological sources, Pulter explores the pig’s refusal to remain pure even when cleansed: like the dog who slurps up his own vomit, the pig almost cannot resist falling back into muddy cycles of immorality. Pulter interprets the ermine’s legendary willingness to sacrifice herself rather than have her fur tainted in Christian terms: her whiteness is precious because washed by Christ’s blood. The poem is formally innovative by dividing into two sections, each composed of two stanzas of triplets followed by a 6-line stanza of couplets. While the narrator seems to be guiding readers from a position of moral confidence, the ending couplet transforms into a plea that makes her complicit in the struggle to avoid being swine-like in the mire of life.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
30This Ugly Sow descended of that Bore
This ugly sow, descended of
Gloss Note
the boar that killed Adonis when he was hunting; Venus, Adonis’s lover, had warned him not to engage in this deadly sport.
that boar
2
Which Epitragius, Lovers intrales Tore
Which
Gloss Note
Aphrodite Epitragia (“riding on a she-goat”) was another name for Venus, goddess of love, reputedly derived from a story in which Theseus sacrificed a goat to her and it changed genders.
Epitragia’s
lover’s entrails tore,
3
Whoſe death the Queen of Love did Soe deplore
Whose death the
Gloss Note
Venus, or Aphrodite
queen of love
did so
Gloss Note
lament
deplore
:
4
This lothſome Beast beſmear’d w:th dirt & blood
This loathsome beast, besmeared with dirt and blood,
5
Being newly waſh’d in Yonder Cristall flood
Being newly washed in yonder crystal flood,
6
Yet now you See Shee’s wallowing in the Mud
Yet now you see she’s wallowing in the mud.
7
Soe penitence and pennance, Some noe more
So penitence and penance, some no more
8
Doe valew, then to Sin on A new Score
Do value than to sin on a new
Gloss Note
account or reckoning
score
.
9
Thus like the dog they to their vomit turn
Thus
Gloss Note
proverbial. “But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire” (2 Peter 2:22). See also “As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his folly” (Proverbs 26:11).
like the dog they to their vomit turn
,
10
Licking that ffilth up which they Seem’d to Spurn
Licking that filth up which they seemed to spurn;
11
But thoſe which loathingly their Sins deplore
But those which loathingly their sins deplore,
12
Beeing Cleans’d if poſſible will Sin noe more
Being cleansed, if possible will sin no more.
13
But as the Ermine (which you See purſued
But as
Gloss Note
animal in the weasel family known for its white coat; an emblem of purity
the ermine
(which you see pursued
14
By thoſe which long to have their chaps imbru’de
By
Gloss Note
hunting dogs who long to bite the ermine, having their jaws (“chaps) “imbrued” (stained) with blood.
those which long to have their chaps imbrued
15
In innocent blood) by Nature
Physical Note
“s” written over another letter
is
indu’de
In innocent blood) by Nature is
Gloss Note
invested; endowed
endued
16
With Such a loathing of impuritie
With such a loathing of impurity,
17
Rather then o’re a dirty place Shee’l flie
Rather than o’er a dirty place
Gloss Note
the ermine will flee
she’ll fly
,
18
Sheel Yield unto her Curſed foes and die
Gloss Note
The ermine was legendary for being willing to die rather than have her pure white fur blemished.
She’ll yield unto her cursed foes and die
.
19
Soe Shee that knows her Self to bee Gods Child
So she that knows herself to be God’s child
20
Will die A Thouſand deaths e’re bee defild
Will die a thousand deaths
Gloss Note
before
ere
be defiled.
21
Shee knows her Saviours guiltles blood did flow
She knows
Gloss Note
Christ sacrificed himself in being crucified.
her Savior’s guiltless blood did flow
22
To waſh her sinfull Soul as white as Snow
To wash her sinful soul as white as snow.
23
Then Ermin like let my Sad Soul expire
Then ermine-like let my sad soul expire,
24
Physical Note
caret inverted
Whivlst
others Hoglike tumble in the Mire.
Whilst others hog-like tumble in the
Gloss Note
mud; state of degradation
mire
.
ascending straight line
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

Pigs, boars, and hogs do not fare well in Pulter’s moral zoo. As in Mark But Those Hogs (Emblem 34) [Poem 99] where grunting, earth-bound pigs are unfavorably compared to heavenly turtledoves, Pulter here contrasts the filth of pigs to the purity of ermines. Citing proverbial, biblical, and mythological sources, Pulter explores the pig’s refusal to remain pure even when cleansed: like the dog who slurps up his own vomit, the pig almost cannot resist falling back into muddy cycles of immorality. Pulter interprets the ermine’s legendary willingness to sacrifice herself rather than have her fur tainted in Christian terms: her whiteness is precious because washed by Christ’s blood. The poem is formally innovative by dividing into two sections, each composed of two stanzas of triplets followed by a 6-line stanza of couplets. While the narrator seems to be guiding readers from a position of moral confidence, the ending couplet transforms into a plea that makes her complicit in the struggle to avoid being swine-like in the mire of life.
Line number 1

 Gloss note

the boar that killed Adonis when he was hunting; Venus, Adonis’s lover, had warned him not to engage in this deadly sport.
Line number 2

 Gloss note

Aphrodite Epitragia (“riding on a she-goat”) was another name for Venus, goddess of love, reputedly derived from a story in which Theseus sacrificed a goat to her and it changed genders.
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Venus, or Aphrodite
Line number 3

 Gloss note

lament
Line number 8

 Gloss note

account or reckoning
Line number 9

 Gloss note

proverbial. “But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire” (2 Peter 2:22). See also “As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his folly” (Proverbs 26:11).
Line number 13

 Gloss note

animal in the weasel family known for its white coat; an emblem of purity
Line number 14

 Gloss note

hunting dogs who long to bite the ermine, having their jaws (“chaps) “imbrued” (stained) with blood.
Line number 15

 Gloss note

invested; endowed
Line number 17

 Gloss note

the ermine will flee
Line number 18

 Gloss note

The ermine was legendary for being willing to die rather than have her pure white fur blemished.
Line number 20

 Gloss note

before
Line number 21

 Gloss note

Christ sacrificed himself in being crucified.
Line number 24

 Gloss note

mud; state of degradation
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 30]
This Ugly Sow
(Emblem 30)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Pigs, boars, and hogs do not fare well in Pulter’s moral zoo. As in Mark But Those Hogs (Emblem 34) [Poem 99] where grunting, earth-bound pigs are unfavorably compared to heavenly turtledoves, Pulter here contrasts the filth of pigs to the purity of ermines. Citing proverbial, biblical, and mythological sources, Pulter explores the pig’s refusal to remain pure even when cleansed: like the dog who slurps up his own vomit, the pig almost cannot resist falling back into muddy cycles of immorality. Pulter interprets the ermine’s legendary willingness to sacrifice herself rather than have her fur tainted in Christian terms: her whiteness is precious because washed by Christ’s blood. The poem is formally innovative by dividing into two sections, each composed of two stanzas of triplets followed by a 6-line stanza of couplets. While the narrator seems to be guiding readers from a position of moral confidence, the ending couplet transforms into a plea that makes her complicit in the struggle to avoid being swine-like in the mire of life.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
30This Ugly Sow descended of that Bore
This ugly sow, descended of
Gloss Note
the boar that killed Adonis when he was hunting; Venus, Adonis’s lover, had warned him not to engage in this deadly sport.
that boar
2
Which Epitragius, Lovers intrales Tore
Which
Gloss Note
Aphrodite Epitragia (“riding on a she-goat”) was another name for Venus, goddess of love, reputedly derived from a story in which Theseus sacrificed a goat to her and it changed genders.
Epitragia’s
lover’s entrails tore,
3
Whoſe death the Queen of Love did Soe deplore
Whose death the
Gloss Note
Venus, or Aphrodite
queen of love
did so
Gloss Note
lament
deplore
:
4
This lothſome Beast beſmear’d w:th dirt & blood
This loathsome beast, besmeared with dirt and blood,
5
Being newly waſh’d in Yonder Cristall flood
Being newly washed in yonder crystal flood,
6
Yet now you See Shee’s wallowing in the Mud
Yet now you see she’s wallowing in the mud.
7
Soe penitence and pennance, Some noe more
So penitence and penance, some no more
8
Doe valew, then to Sin on A new Score
Do value than to sin on a new
Gloss Note
account or reckoning
score
.
9
Thus like the dog they to their vomit turn
Thus
Gloss Note
proverbial. “But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire” (2 Peter 2:22). See also “As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his folly” (Proverbs 26:11).
like the dog they to their vomit turn
,
10
Licking that ffilth up which they Seem’d to Spurn
Licking that filth up which they seemed to spurn;
11
But thoſe which loathingly their Sins deplore
But those which loathingly their sins deplore,
12
Beeing Cleans’d if poſſible will Sin noe more
Being cleansed, if possible will sin no more.
13
But as the Ermine (which you See purſued
But as
Gloss Note
animal in the weasel family known for its white coat; an emblem of purity
the ermine
(which you see pursued
14
By thoſe which long to have their chaps imbru’de
By
Gloss Note
hunting dogs who long to bite the ermine, having their jaws (“chaps) “imbrued” (stained) with blood.
those which long to have their chaps imbrued
15
In innocent blood) by Nature
Physical Note
“s” written over another letter
is
indu’de
In innocent blood) by Nature is
Gloss Note
invested; endowed
endued
16
With Such a loathing of impuritie
With such a loathing of impurity,
17
Rather then o’re a dirty place Shee’l flie
Rather than o’er a dirty place
Gloss Note
the ermine will flee
she’ll fly
,
18
Sheel Yield unto her Curſed foes and die
Gloss Note
The ermine was legendary for being willing to die rather than have her pure white fur blemished.
She’ll yield unto her cursed foes and die
.
19
Soe Shee that knows her Self to bee Gods Child
So she that knows herself to be God’s child
20
Will die A Thouſand deaths e’re bee defild
Will die a thousand deaths
Gloss Note
before
ere
be defiled.
21
Shee knows her Saviours guiltles blood did flow
She knows
Gloss Note
Christ sacrificed himself in being crucified.
her Savior’s guiltless blood did flow
22
To waſh her sinfull Soul as white as Snow
To wash her sinful soul as white as snow.
23
Then Ermin like let my Sad Soul expire
Then ermine-like let my sad soul expire,
24
Physical Note
caret inverted
Whivlst
others Hoglike tumble in the Mire.
Whilst others hog-like tumble in the
Gloss Note
mud; state of degradation
mire
.
ascending straight line
X (Close panel) All Notes
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Amplified Edition

 Editorial note

Elemental Edition

 Headnote

Pigs, boars, and hogs do not fare well in Pulter’s moral zoo. As in Mark But Those Hogs (Emblem 34) [Poem 99] where grunting, earth-bound pigs are unfavorably compared to heavenly turtledoves, Pulter here contrasts the filth of pigs to the purity of ermines. Citing proverbial, biblical, and mythological sources, Pulter explores the pig’s refusal to remain pure even when cleansed: like the dog who slurps up his own vomit, the pig almost cannot resist falling back into muddy cycles of immorality. Pulter interprets the ermine’s legendary willingness to sacrifice herself rather than have her fur tainted in Christian terms: her whiteness is precious because washed by Christ’s blood. The poem is formally innovative by dividing into two sections, each composed of two stanzas of triplets followed by a 6-line stanza of couplets. While the narrator seems to be guiding readers from a position of moral confidence, the ending couplet transforms into a plea that makes her complicit in the struggle to avoid being swine-like in the mire of life.
Amplified Edition

 Headnote

Elemental Edition
Line number 1

 Gloss note

the boar that killed Adonis when he was hunting; Venus, Adonis’s lover, had warned him not to engage in this deadly sport.
Elemental Edition
Line number 2

 Gloss note

Aphrodite Epitragia (“riding on a she-goat”) was another name for Venus, goddess of love, reputedly derived from a story in which Theseus sacrificed a goat to her and it changed genders.
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Venus, or Aphrodite
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

lament
Elemental Edition
Line number 8

 Gloss note

account or reckoning
Elemental Edition
Line number 9

 Gloss note

proverbial. “But it is happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog is turned to his own vomit again; and the sow that was washed to her wallowing in the mire” (2 Peter 2:22). See also “As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his folly” (Proverbs 26:11).
Elemental Edition
Line number 13

 Gloss note

animal in the weasel family known for its white coat; an emblem of purity
Elemental Edition
Line number 14

 Gloss note

hunting dogs who long to bite the ermine, having their jaws (“chaps) “imbrued” (stained) with blood.
Transcription
Line number 15

 Physical note

“s” written over another letter
Elemental Edition
Line number 15

 Gloss note

invested; endowed
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

the ermine will flee
Elemental Edition
Line number 18

 Gloss note

The ermine was legendary for being willing to die rather than have her pure white fur blemished.
Elemental Edition
Line number 20

 Gloss note

before
Elemental Edition
Line number 21

 Gloss note

Christ sacrificed himself in being crucified.
Transcription
Line number 24

 Physical note

caret inverted
Elemental Edition
Line number 24

 Gloss note

mud; state of degradation
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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