The Stately Moose (Emblem 27)

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The Stately Moose (Emblem 27)

Poem #92

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
  • Website designed by Sergei Kalugin, Northwestern University
  • IT project consultation by Josh Honn, Northwestern University
  • Project sponsored by Northwestern University, Brock University, and University of Leeds
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Line number 1

 Physical note

poem follows end of the preceding one on same page, beginning two-thirds down
Line number 7

 Physical note

the “S” is possibly written over a prior letter (or there is an ink transfer across the page with a descender)
Line number 11

 Physical note

“u” corrects earlier “n”
Line number 11

 Physical note

all but comma (and possibly comma) in different hand from main scribe
Line number 36

 Physical note

written over “ff” and other letters, likely “ffor”
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Transcription
Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 27]
The Stately Moose
(Emblem 27)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
This poem’s picturesque opening scene—a hill above a river valley, a moose munching quietly, her young skipping and playing—is darkly savaged when the moose is so foolish as to forego high ground and the light of day, out of envy of those in the shade beneath. The imagery is simultaneously naturalistic and moral, and the moose’s comeuppance speedy and grotesque: in the dark forest, she is “snatched,” “overpowered,” and “devoured” by a snake (again, uniting the naturalistic and the moral). The speaker then links this vivid image of a moose-stuffed serpent to more ordinary kinds of predation and, finally, a sequence of fairly banal complaints: “on this orb there’s no felicity”; “we are in a sea of sorrows tossed”; “when we’re most secure, we’re nearest lost.” In the face of such relentless carnage and misery throughout the animal kingdom, it’s no surprise that the speaker’s final declaration of fealty is to God instead.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
27
Physical Note
poem follows end of the preceding one on same page, beginning two-thirds down
The
Stately Mooz being ^mounted up the hill
The stately moose, being mounted up the hill,
2
And of the beavtious proſpect tane her fill
And of the beauteous prospect taken her fill,
3
Viewing the Rivers in the vale that Trace
Viewing the rivers in the
Gloss Note
valley
vale
that
Gloss Note
pass
trace
,
4
Inriching ffloras Robe like Silver Lace
Enriching
Gloss Note
goddess of spring
Flora’s
robe like silver lace;
5
The next thing Shee Conſiders is her diet
The next thing she considers is her diet:
6
How Shee may eat the fflowers and herbs in quiet
How she may eat the flowers and herbs in quiet.
7
Then Politickly
Physical Note
the “S” is possibly written over a prior letter (or there is an ink transfer across the page with a descender)
Shee
doth the ffeilds Survey
Then
Gloss Note
shrewdly
politicly
she doth the fields survey
8
To See if any cruell Beasts of prey
To see if any cruel beasts of prey–
9
As Lion, Tiger, Leopard, or Bear,
As lion, tiger, leopard, or bear–
10
Might her disturb, but to diſpell all fear
Might her disturb; but to dispel all fear,
11
Physical Note
“u” corrects earlier “n”
ffauns
, Lambs
Physical Note
all but comma (and possibly comma) in different hand from main scribe
\, and \
Kids, did Skip about and play
Fawns, lambs, and kids did skip about and play
12
Whilst their old weary Dams their Sentinels lay
Whilst their old weary dams, their
Gloss Note
guards
sentinels
, lay.
thus

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
13
Thus beeing Secure Shee feeding down did goe
Thus, being secure, she feeding down did go,
14
ffor Nature plac’t her Stag like horns Soe low
For Nature placed her stag-like horns so low
15
That Shee could never have of graſs her ffill
That she could never have of grass her fill.
16
But when in feeding Shee went down the Hill
But when, in feeding, she went down the hill
17
Which lay full South, the Sun being now her zeneth
Which lay full south, the sun being
Gloss Note
now at
now
her zenith,
18
Which made her envie thoſe that fed bene’th
Which made her envy those that fed
Gloss Note
beneath the shade
beneath
,
19
His Perpendiculer beams did Scald her Soe
His perpendicular beams did scald her so,
20
That Shee Reſolv’d into the Shades to goe
That she resolved into the shade to go
21
Of Straight Armd Cedars, ffirrs, Cypres, Pine
Of straight-armed cedars, firs, cypress, pine,
22
About whoſe branches horrid Serpents Twine
About whose branches horrid serpents twine.
23
One of the Hugest Slip’d down from a bough
One of the hugest slipped down from a bough
24
And Snatcht the Mooz (poor Beast) Shee knew not how
And snatched the moose (poor beast!) she knew not how.
25
Thus beeing by this Monſter over powr’d
Thus being by this monster overpowered
26
(Oh her hard fate) Shee was by him devour’d
(O her hard fate!), she was by him devoured.
27
Soe have I Seen a hawk A Pheſant truſs
So have I seen a hawk a pheasant
Gloss Note
seize
truss
28
Or Patriges, Soe Melancholly Puſs
(Or partridges), so
Gloss Note
Cats were proverbially associated with sadness.
melancholy puss
29
Doth Mice Surpriſe, Soe ffoxes Snatch up Lambs
Doth mice
Gloss Note
attack suddenly
surprise
, so foxes snatch up lambs
30
As they lie playing by their Uberous Dams
As they lie playing by their
Gloss Note
nursing, nurturing
uberous
dams–
31
By which example wee may plainly See
By which example we may plainly see
32
That on this Orb ther’s noe felicitie
That on this orb there’s no felicity.
33
ffor Death & Hell Combine, and Watch each hour
For Death and Hell combine and watch, each hour
34
Our Sinfull Souls, and bodies to devour
Our sinful souls and bodies to devour;
35
'ffor wee are in A Sea of Sorrows Tost
For we are in a sea of sorrows tossed,
36
Physical Note
written over “ff” and other letters, likely “ffor”
And
when we’re most Secure wee’r nearest lost
And when we’re most secure, we’re nearest lost.
37
As Beauclarks Children did their wrack deplore
As
Gloss Note
The children of King Henry I (Henry Beauclerc), including his heir and many illegitimate children, drowned when their ship hit a rock near the shore of Normandy.
Beauclerc’s children
did their wrack
Gloss Note
lament
deplore
38
With Greater grief beeing in the Sight of Shore
With greater grief being in the sight of shore.
39
Then Seeing our lives Soe frail and Caſuall bee
Then seeing our lives so frail and
Gloss Note
subject to chance
casual
be,
40
Let mee depend (dear God) on none but thee.
Let me depend (dear God) on none but Thee.
horizontal straight line
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

This poem’s picturesque opening scene—a hill above a river valley, a moose munching quietly, her young skipping and playing—is darkly savaged when the moose is so foolish as to forego high ground and the light of day, out of envy of those in the shade beneath. The imagery is simultaneously naturalistic and moral, and the moose’s comeuppance speedy and grotesque: in the dark forest, she is “snatched,” “overpowered,” and “devoured” by a snake (again, uniting the naturalistic and the moral). The speaker then links this vivid image of a moose-stuffed serpent to more ordinary kinds of predation and, finally, a sequence of fairly banal complaints: “on this orb there’s no felicity”; “we are in a sea of sorrows tossed”; “when we’re most secure, we’re nearest lost.” In the face of such relentless carnage and misery throughout the animal kingdom, it’s no surprise that the speaker’s final declaration of fealty is to God instead.
Line number 3

 Gloss note

valley
Line number 3

 Gloss note

pass
Line number 4

 Gloss note

goddess of spring
Line number 7

 Gloss note

shrewdly
Line number 12

 Gloss note

guards
Line number 17

 Gloss note

now at
Line number 18

 Gloss note

beneath the shade
Line number 27

 Gloss note

seize
Line number 28

 Gloss note

Cats were proverbially associated with sadness.
Line number 29

 Gloss note

attack suddenly
Line number 30

 Gloss note

nursing, nurturing
Line number 37

 Gloss note

The children of King Henry I (Henry Beauclerc), including his heir and many illegitimate children, drowned when their ship hit a rock near the shore of Normandy.
Line number 37

 Gloss note

lament
Line number 39

 Gloss note

subject to chance
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 27]
The Stately Moose
(Emblem 27)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
This poem’s picturesque opening scene—a hill above a river valley, a moose munching quietly, her young skipping and playing—is darkly savaged when the moose is so foolish as to forego high ground and the light of day, out of envy of those in the shade beneath. The imagery is simultaneously naturalistic and moral, and the moose’s comeuppance speedy and grotesque: in the dark forest, she is “snatched,” “overpowered,” and “devoured” by a snake (again, uniting the naturalistic and the moral). The speaker then links this vivid image of a moose-stuffed serpent to more ordinary kinds of predation and, finally, a sequence of fairly banal complaints: “on this orb there’s no felicity”; “we are in a sea of sorrows tossed”; “when we’re most secure, we’re nearest lost.” In the face of such relentless carnage and misery throughout the animal kingdom, it’s no surprise that the speaker’s final declaration of fealty is to God instead.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
27
Physical Note
poem follows end of the preceding one on same page, beginning two-thirds down
The
Stately Mooz being ^mounted up the hill
The stately moose, being mounted up the hill,
2
And of the beavtious proſpect tane her fill
And of the beauteous prospect taken her fill,
3
Viewing the Rivers in the vale that Trace
Viewing the rivers in the
Gloss Note
valley
vale
that
Gloss Note
pass
trace
,
4
Inriching ffloras Robe like Silver Lace
Enriching
Gloss Note
goddess of spring
Flora’s
robe like silver lace;
5
The next thing Shee Conſiders is her diet
The next thing she considers is her diet:
6
How Shee may eat the fflowers and herbs in quiet
How she may eat the flowers and herbs in quiet.
7
Then Politickly
Physical Note
the “S” is possibly written over a prior letter (or there is an ink transfer across the page with a descender)
Shee
doth the ffeilds Survey
Then
Gloss Note
shrewdly
politicly
she doth the fields survey
8
To See if any cruell Beasts of prey
To see if any cruel beasts of prey–
9
As Lion, Tiger, Leopard, or Bear,
As lion, tiger, leopard, or bear–
10
Might her disturb, but to diſpell all fear
Might her disturb; but to dispel all fear,
11
Physical Note
“u” corrects earlier “n”
ffauns
, Lambs
Physical Note
all but comma (and possibly comma) in different hand from main scribe
\, and \
Kids, did Skip about and play
Fawns, lambs, and kids did skip about and play
12
Whilst their old weary Dams their Sentinels lay
Whilst their old weary dams, their
Gloss Note
guards
sentinels
, lay.
thus

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
13
Thus beeing Secure Shee feeding down did goe
Thus, being secure, she feeding down did go,
14
ffor Nature plac’t her Stag like horns Soe low
For Nature placed her stag-like horns so low
15
That Shee could never have of graſs her ffill
That she could never have of grass her fill.
16
But when in feeding Shee went down the Hill
But when, in feeding, she went down the hill
17
Which lay full South, the Sun being now her zeneth
Which lay full south, the sun being
Gloss Note
now at
now
her zenith,
18
Which made her envie thoſe that fed bene’th
Which made her envy those that fed
Gloss Note
beneath the shade
beneath
,
19
His Perpendiculer beams did Scald her Soe
His perpendicular beams did scald her so,
20
That Shee Reſolv’d into the Shades to goe
That she resolved into the shade to go
21
Of Straight Armd Cedars, ffirrs, Cypres, Pine
Of straight-armed cedars, firs, cypress, pine,
22
About whoſe branches horrid Serpents Twine
About whose branches horrid serpents twine.
23
One of the Hugest Slip’d down from a bough
One of the hugest slipped down from a bough
24
And Snatcht the Mooz (poor Beast) Shee knew not how
And snatched the moose (poor beast!) she knew not how.
25
Thus beeing by this Monſter over powr’d
Thus being by this monster overpowered
26
(Oh her hard fate) Shee was by him devour’d
(O her hard fate!), she was by him devoured.
27
Soe have I Seen a hawk A Pheſant truſs
So have I seen a hawk a pheasant
Gloss Note
seize
truss
28
Or Patriges, Soe Melancholly Puſs
(Or partridges), so
Gloss Note
Cats were proverbially associated with sadness.
melancholy puss
29
Doth Mice Surpriſe, Soe ffoxes Snatch up Lambs
Doth mice
Gloss Note
attack suddenly
surprise
, so foxes snatch up lambs
30
As they lie playing by their Uberous Dams
As they lie playing by their
Gloss Note
nursing, nurturing
uberous
dams–
31
By which example wee may plainly See
By which example we may plainly see
32
That on this Orb ther’s noe felicitie
That on this orb there’s no felicity.
33
ffor Death & Hell Combine, and Watch each hour
For Death and Hell combine and watch, each hour
34
Our Sinfull Souls, and bodies to devour
Our sinful souls and bodies to devour;
35
'ffor wee are in A Sea of Sorrows Tost
For we are in a sea of sorrows tossed,
36
Physical Note
written over “ff” and other letters, likely “ffor”
And
when we’re most Secure wee’r nearest lost
And when we’re most secure, we’re nearest lost.
37
As Beauclarks Children did their wrack deplore
As
Gloss Note
The children of King Henry I (Henry Beauclerc), including his heir and many illegitimate children, drowned when their ship hit a rock near the shore of Normandy.
Beauclerc’s children
did their wrack
Gloss Note
lament
deplore
38
With Greater grief beeing in the Sight of Shore
With greater grief being in the sight of shore.
39
Then Seeing our lives Soe frail and Caſuall bee
Then seeing our lives so frail and
Gloss Note
subject to chance
casual
be,
40
Let mee depend (dear God) on none but thee.
Let me depend (dear God) on none but Thee.
horizontal straight line
X (Close panel) All Notes
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Amplified Edition

 Editorial note

Elemental Edition

 Headnote

This poem’s picturesque opening scene—a hill above a river valley, a moose munching quietly, her young skipping and playing—is darkly savaged when the moose is so foolish as to forego high ground and the light of day, out of envy of those in the shade beneath. The imagery is simultaneously naturalistic and moral, and the moose’s comeuppance speedy and grotesque: in the dark forest, she is “snatched,” “overpowered,” and “devoured” by a snake (again, uniting the naturalistic and the moral). The speaker then links this vivid image of a moose-stuffed serpent to more ordinary kinds of predation and, finally, a sequence of fairly banal complaints: “on this orb there’s no felicity”; “we are in a sea of sorrows tossed”; “when we’re most secure, we’re nearest lost.” In the face of such relentless carnage and misery throughout the animal kingdom, it’s no surprise that the speaker’s final declaration of fealty is to God instead.
Amplified Edition

 Headnote

Transcription
Line number 1

 Physical note

poem follows end of the preceding one on same page, beginning two-thirds down
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

valley
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

pass
Elemental Edition
Line number 4

 Gloss note

goddess of spring
Transcription
Line number 7

 Physical note

the “S” is possibly written over a prior letter (or there is an ink transfer across the page with a descender)
Elemental Edition
Line number 7

 Gloss note

shrewdly
Transcription
Line number 11

 Physical note

“u” corrects earlier “n”
Transcription
Line number 11

 Physical note

all but comma (and possibly comma) in different hand from main scribe
Elemental Edition
Line number 12

 Gloss note

guards
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

now at
Elemental Edition
Line number 18

 Gloss note

beneath the shade
Elemental Edition
Line number 27

 Gloss note

seize
Elemental Edition
Line number 28

 Gloss note

Cats were proverbially associated with sadness.
Elemental Edition
Line number 29

 Gloss note

attack suddenly
Elemental Edition
Line number 30

 Gloss note

nursing, nurturing
Transcription
Line number 36

 Physical note

written over “ff” and other letters, likely “ffor”
Elemental Edition
Line number 37

 Gloss note

The children of King Henry I (Henry Beauclerc), including his heir and many illegitimate children, drowned when their ship hit a rock near the shore of Normandy.
Elemental Edition
Line number 37

 Gloss note

lament
Elemental Edition
Line number 39

 Gloss note

subject to chance
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
ManuscriptX (Close panel)
image
ManuscriptX (Close panel)
image