Pardon Me, My Dearest Love

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Pardon Me, My Dearest Love

Poem #42

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
  • Website designed by Sergei Kalugin, Northwestern University
  • IT project consultation by Josh Honn, Northwestern University
  • Project sponsored by Northwestern University, Brock University, and University of Leeds
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Transcription
Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Untitled]
Pardon Me, My Dearest Love
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Pulter’s only poem written to her husband consists of an apology for courting another “love.” In this poem, she unusually acknowledges her romantic and marital commitments by describing herself as her husband’s “poor turtledove,” a creature famed for virtuous and lifelong fidelity. Conceding that her husband has a right to her care and attention while she is on earth, she asks his pardon for her constant preoccupation with the allures of Heaven, her flights of fancy that allow her to activate the “sparkle” of heavenly essence in her soul and seemingly abandon “this dirty, dunghill earth.” The world materializes as a place of excrement, violent dismemberment, and sin, with the glories of heaven drawing out a “love” that Pulter represents as rivalling (rather than complementing) her romantic attachments on earth.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
Pardon mee my Dearest Love
Pardon me, my dearest love,
2
That I place my thoughts aboue
That I place my thoughts above.
3
What’s Subſolary is yours
What’s
Gloss Note
beneath the sun
subsolary
is yours
4
And Soe Shall Bee while Life indures
And so shall be while life endures.
5
Onely my aſpireing mind
Only my aspiring mind
6
Noe felicity can find
No felicity can find
7
In this Dirty Dunghill Earth
In this dirty,
Gloss Note
excrement-like
dunghill
earth.
8
My Soul Remembers still her Birth
My soul remembers still her birth,
9
Shee beeing a Sparkle of that Light
She being a sparkle of that
Critical Note
originary divine spirit; see John 1:9: “That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.”
Light
10
Which ne’re Shall Set in Death or night
Which ne’er shall set in death or night.
11
Nothing here is worth her Love
Nothing here is worth her love;
12
Her Sumum bonum is above
Her
Gloss Note
supreme good
summum bonum
is above.
13
But this Body Shortly must
But this body shortly must
14
Melt and moulder into Dust
Melt and moulder into
Critical Note
fine particles, esp. of disintegrating dead body; also, formative physical elements; see Genesis 2:7: “And the Lord God formed man [of] the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.”
dust
.
15
This due Debt cant bee denied
This due debt can’t be denied;
16
The Elliments must mee Divide
The
Gloss Note
in ancient and premodern theory, the four constitutive substances of which all material bodies are compounded: earth, fire, air, and water
elements
must me divide.
17
Thus like Trators quarter’d out
Thus, like traitors
Gloss Note
A judicial penalty for high treason in England was “quartering” (or dividing) the body of the convicted person.
quartered out
,
18
Are old Adams Rebell Rout
Are
Gloss Note
Adam, the first human in the Judeo-Christian creation story, and an emblem of sin; a “rout” is a crowd.
old Adam’s rebel rout
.
19
Then Shall my infranchiſ’d Spirit
Then shall my
Gloss Note
freed, privileged
enfranchised
spirit
20
Thoſe Eternall Joyes inherit
Those eternal joys inherit,
21
Which from mee Shall never part
Which from me shall never part:
22
With theſe thoughts I cheer my heart
With these thoughts, I cheer my heart.
then

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
23
Then pardon thy poor Turtle Dove
Then pardon thy poor
Gloss Note
A bird known for its affection for its mate and soothing songs.
turtledove
24
That hath plac’d her thoughts aboue
That hath placed her thoughts above
25
Where is endles Joy and Love.
Where is endless joy and love.
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

Pulter’s only poem written to her husband consists of an apology for courting another “love.” In this poem, she unusually acknowledges her romantic and marital commitments by describing herself as her husband’s “poor turtledove,” a creature famed for virtuous and lifelong fidelity. Conceding that her husband has a right to her care and attention while she is on earth, she asks his pardon for her constant preoccupation with the allures of Heaven, her flights of fancy that allow her to activate the “sparkle” of heavenly essence in her soul and seemingly abandon “this dirty, dunghill earth.” The world materializes as a place of excrement, violent dismemberment, and sin, with the glories of heaven drawing out a “love” that Pulter represents as rivalling (rather than complementing) her romantic attachments on earth.
Line number 3

 Gloss note

beneath the sun
Line number 7

 Gloss note

excrement-like
Line number 9

 Critical note

originary divine spirit; see John 1:9: “That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.”
Line number 12

 Gloss note

supreme good
Line number 14

 Critical note

fine particles, esp. of disintegrating dead body; also, formative physical elements; see Genesis 2:7: “And the Lord God formed man [of] the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.”
Line number 16

 Gloss note

in ancient and premodern theory, the four constitutive substances of which all material bodies are compounded: earth, fire, air, and water
Line number 17

 Gloss note

A judicial penalty for high treason in England was “quartering” (or dividing) the body of the convicted person.
Line number 18

 Gloss note

Adam, the first human in the Judeo-Christian creation story, and an emblem of sin; a “rout” is a crowd.
Line number 19

 Gloss note

freed, privileged
Line number 23

 Gloss note

A bird known for its affection for its mate and soothing songs.
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Untitled]
Pardon Me, My Dearest Love
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Pulter’s only poem written to her husband consists of an apology for courting another “love.” In this poem, she unusually acknowledges her romantic and marital commitments by describing herself as her husband’s “poor turtledove,” a creature famed for virtuous and lifelong fidelity. Conceding that her husband has a right to her care and attention while she is on earth, she asks his pardon for her constant preoccupation with the allures of Heaven, her flights of fancy that allow her to activate the “sparkle” of heavenly essence in her soul and seemingly abandon “this dirty, dunghill earth.” The world materializes as a place of excrement, violent dismemberment, and sin, with the glories of heaven drawing out a “love” that Pulter represents as rivalling (rather than complementing) her romantic attachments on earth.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
Pardon mee my Dearest Love
Pardon me, my dearest love,
2
That I place my thoughts aboue
That I place my thoughts above.
3
What’s Subſolary is yours
What’s
Gloss Note
beneath the sun
subsolary
is yours
4
And Soe Shall Bee while Life indures
And so shall be while life endures.
5
Onely my aſpireing mind
Only my aspiring mind
6
Noe felicity can find
No felicity can find
7
In this Dirty Dunghill Earth
In this dirty,
Gloss Note
excrement-like
dunghill
earth.
8
My Soul Remembers still her Birth
My soul remembers still her birth,
9
Shee beeing a Sparkle of that Light
She being a sparkle of that
Critical Note
originary divine spirit; see John 1:9: “That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.”
Light
10
Which ne’re Shall Set in Death or night
Which ne’er shall set in death or night.
11
Nothing here is worth her Love
Nothing here is worth her love;
12
Her Sumum bonum is above
Her
Gloss Note
supreme good
summum bonum
is above.
13
But this Body Shortly must
But this body shortly must
14
Melt and moulder into Dust
Melt and moulder into
Critical Note
fine particles, esp. of disintegrating dead body; also, formative physical elements; see Genesis 2:7: “And the Lord God formed man [of] the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.”
dust
.
15
This due Debt cant bee denied
This due debt can’t be denied;
16
The Elliments must mee Divide
The
Gloss Note
in ancient and premodern theory, the four constitutive substances of which all material bodies are compounded: earth, fire, air, and water
elements
must me divide.
17
Thus like Trators quarter’d out
Thus, like traitors
Gloss Note
A judicial penalty for high treason in England was “quartering” (or dividing) the body of the convicted person.
quartered out
,
18
Are old Adams Rebell Rout
Are
Gloss Note
Adam, the first human in the Judeo-Christian creation story, and an emblem of sin; a “rout” is a crowd.
old Adam’s rebel rout
.
19
Then Shall my infranchiſ’d Spirit
Then shall my
Gloss Note
freed, privileged
enfranchised
spirit
20
Thoſe Eternall Joyes inherit
Those eternal joys inherit,
21
Which from mee Shall never part
Which from me shall never part:
22
With theſe thoughts I cheer my heart
With these thoughts, I cheer my heart.
then

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
23
Then pardon thy poor Turtle Dove
Then pardon thy poor
Gloss Note
A bird known for its affection for its mate and soothing songs.
turtledove
24
That hath plac’d her thoughts aboue
That hath placed her thoughts above
25
Where is endles Joy and Love.
Where is endless joy and love.
X (Close panel) All Notes
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Amplified Edition

 Editorial note

Elemental Edition

 Headnote

Pulter’s only poem written to her husband consists of an apology for courting another “love.” In this poem, she unusually acknowledges her romantic and marital commitments by describing herself as her husband’s “poor turtledove,” a creature famed for virtuous and lifelong fidelity. Conceding that her husband has a right to her care and attention while she is on earth, she asks his pardon for her constant preoccupation with the allures of Heaven, her flights of fancy that allow her to activate the “sparkle” of heavenly essence in her soul and seemingly abandon “this dirty, dunghill earth.” The world materializes as a place of excrement, violent dismemberment, and sin, with the glories of heaven drawing out a “love” that Pulter represents as rivalling (rather than complementing) her romantic attachments on earth.
Amplified Edition

 Headnote

Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

beneath the sun
Elemental Edition
Line number 7

 Gloss note

excrement-like
Elemental Edition
Line number 9

 Critical note

originary divine spirit; see John 1:9: “That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.”
Elemental Edition
Line number 12

 Gloss note

supreme good
Elemental Edition
Line number 14

 Critical note

fine particles, esp. of disintegrating dead body; also, formative physical elements; see Genesis 2:7: “And the Lord God formed man [of] the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.”
Elemental Edition
Line number 16

 Gloss note

in ancient and premodern theory, the four constitutive substances of which all material bodies are compounded: earth, fire, air, and water
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

A judicial penalty for high treason in England was “quartering” (or dividing) the body of the convicted person.
Elemental Edition
Line number 18

 Gloss note

Adam, the first human in the Judeo-Christian creation story, and an emblem of sin; a “rout” is a crowd.
Elemental Edition
Line number 19

 Gloss note

freed, privileged
Elemental Edition
Line number 23

 Gloss note

A bird known for its affection for its mate and soothing songs.
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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