This Horizontal Bird (Emblem 35)

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This Horizontal Bird (Emblem 35)

Poem #100

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
  • Website designed by Sergei Kalugin, Northwestern University
  • IT project consultation by Josh Honn, Northwestern University
  • Project sponsored by Northwestern University, Brock University, and University of Leeds
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Line number 1

 Physical note

vertical strike-through
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Transcription
Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 35]
This Horizontal Bird
(Emblem 35)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
A footless bird and upturned fish eyes are the unlikely sources of inspiration in this emblem. The unique anatomy (imaginary or not) of two obscure creatures enables apparently spiritual behavior in them which the poet proffers as a model for her readers. The close parallels between this poem’s counsel to constancy and that in many other items in Pulter’s manuscript, far from being a sign of redundancy, is in fact thematically sound in a poem about the resounding virtue of each creature remaining “the same she was before.” However grounded it might be in biology, such a rehearsal is also construed here as a mimetic performance, an art form not unrelated to the verse in which it is both described and inscribed. The beauty as well as difficulty of imitating abstractions and animals alike (“this soul, that bird, and fish”) should galvanize readers to be steadfast in keeping their sights firmly above the earthly fray.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
35Seest thou this Horizentall
Physical Note
vertical strike-through
Birds
whoſe Eyes
Seest thou
Gloss Note
perhaps the manucodiat or bird of paradise, which Pulter invokes elsewhere (see “The Manucodiats” [Emblem 5] [Poem 71]). Her account may draw on Simon Goulart’s A Learned Summary Upon the Famous Poem of William of Saluste Lord of Bartas, where the birds are described as being “remain[ing] always in the air” and even as having “no feet” (London, 1621), 1.241; the fact that they are always flying might explain Pulter’s epithet of “horizontal.”
this horizontal bird
, whose eyes
2
Are ffixt immoveable upon the Skies
Are fixed, immovable, upon the skies,
3
Though Night obſcures the Raidient Delias Rayes
Though night obscures the radiant
Gloss Note
Apollo’s, the sun god’s; for a figure usually called Delius (so named because he was from the island of Delos)
Delia’s
rays,
4
Though Clowds doe muffle his bright face a Dayes
Though clouds do muffle his bright face
Gloss Note
in the daytime
adays
?
5
Whether Shee Goes, or feeds, or breeds, or flyes
Whether she goes, or feeds, or breeds, or flies,
6
Yet Still to Heaven Shee Roles her longing Eyes
Yet still to Heav’n she rolls her longing eyes.
7
Soe doth the Sun ffiſh whoſe fair Eyes are ffixt
So doth the
Gloss Note
A number of fish species (called stargazers) have eyes atop their heads; others, sunfish, bask on their sides near the surface and so appear to stare at the sky. Pulter’s account here may draw on that of Goulart’s summary of Du Bartas (cited above), on the gaping fish, whose Greek name means “beholding the Heaven, because he hath two eyes planted above his head” (1.221).
sunfish
, whose fair eyes are fixed
8
On Heaven alone, her love Sure is Unmixt
On Heav’n alone; her love sure is
Gloss Note
pure, undiluted
unmixed
,
9
Although the Sea Works high and billows Swell
Although the sea works high, and billows swell
10
Almost to Heaven, then down as low as Hell
Almost to Heav’n, then down as low as Hell.
11
Though Hurricanians make the Welkin Roar
Though
Gloss Note
seemingly, hurricanes
hurricanians
make the
Gloss Note
sky
welkin
roar,
12
And Marriners their Woefull wracks deplore
And mariners their woeful
Gloss Note
wrecked ships
wracks
Gloss Note
lament
deplore
,
13
Yet Shee is Still the Same Shee was before
Yet she is still the same she was before.
14
Even Soe thoſe Souls whoſe hopes and Joy’s above
E’en so those souls whose hopes and joys above
15
Are onely plac’d, Reverberates that Love
Are only placed,
Gloss Note
sends back, returns
reverberates
that love
16
To Heaven from whence they had Iradiation
To Heav’n from whence they had
Gloss Note
a beaming forth of spiritual light
irradiation
,
17
Performing Soe the end of their Creation
Performing so the
Gloss Note
purpose
end
of their creation.
18
Soe imitate this Soul, that Bird and ffish
So imitate this soul, that bird, and fish,
19
And though things Anſwer not thy hopes or Wiſh
And though things answer not thy hopes or wish,
20
Yet look towards Heaven, on God alone depend
Yet look towards Heav’n, on God alone depend:
21
Hee will thy Suffrings medigate or End
He will thy suff’rings mitigate or end.
22
And trust not ffortune, nor her Amorous Smiles
And trust not Fortune, nor her amorous smiles;
23
ffor when Shee Courts us most Shee most beguils
For when she courts us most, she most
Gloss Note
deceives; disappoints, foils
beguiles
.
24
Nor fear her ffrowns for there is one on high
Nor fear her frowns, for there is one on high
25
At whoſe bright footstool ffate and ffortune lie
At whose bright footstool Fate and Fortune lie:
26
To him alone to him for Comfort fflie.
To Him alone, to Him for comfort
Gloss Note
flee
fly
.
ascending straight line
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

A footless bird and upturned fish eyes are the unlikely sources of inspiration in this emblem. The unique anatomy (imaginary or not) of two obscure creatures enables apparently spiritual behavior in them which the poet proffers as a model for her readers. The close parallels between this poem’s counsel to constancy and that in many other items in Pulter’s manuscript, far from being a sign of redundancy, is in fact thematically sound in a poem about the resounding virtue of each creature remaining “the same she was before.” However grounded it might be in biology, such a rehearsal is also construed here as a mimetic performance, an art form not unrelated to the verse in which it is both described and inscribed. The beauty as well as difficulty of imitating abstractions and animals alike (“this soul, that bird, and fish”) should galvanize readers to be steadfast in keeping their sights firmly above the earthly fray.
Line number 1

 Gloss note

perhaps the manucodiat or bird of paradise, which Pulter invokes elsewhere (see “The Manucodiats” [Emblem 5] [Poem 71]). Her account may draw on Simon Goulart’s A Learned Summary Upon the Famous Poem of William of Saluste Lord of Bartas, where the birds are described as being “remain[ing] always in the air” and even as having “no feet” (London, 1621), 1.241; the fact that they are always flying might explain Pulter’s epithet of “horizontal.”
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Apollo’s, the sun god’s; for a figure usually called Delius (so named because he was from the island of Delos)
Line number 4

 Gloss note

in the daytime
Line number 7

 Gloss note

A number of fish species (called stargazers) have eyes atop their heads; others, sunfish, bask on their sides near the surface and so appear to stare at the sky. Pulter’s account here may draw on that of Goulart’s summary of Du Bartas (cited above), on the gaping fish, whose Greek name means “beholding the Heaven, because he hath two eyes planted above his head” (1.221).
Line number 8

 Gloss note

pure, undiluted
Line number 11

 Gloss note

seemingly, hurricanes
Line number 11

 Gloss note

sky
Line number 12

 Gloss note

wrecked ships
Line number 12

 Gloss note

lament
Line number 15

 Gloss note

sends back, returns
Line number 16

 Gloss note

a beaming forth of spiritual light
Line number 17

 Gloss note

purpose
Line number 23

 Gloss note

deceives; disappoints, foils
Line number 26

 Gloss note

flee
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 35]
This Horizontal Bird
(Emblem 35)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
A footless bird and upturned fish eyes are the unlikely sources of inspiration in this emblem. The unique anatomy (imaginary or not) of two obscure creatures enables apparently spiritual behavior in them which the poet proffers as a model for her readers. The close parallels between this poem’s counsel to constancy and that in many other items in Pulter’s manuscript, far from being a sign of redundancy, is in fact thematically sound in a poem about the resounding virtue of each creature remaining “the same she was before.” However grounded it might be in biology, such a rehearsal is also construed here as a mimetic performance, an art form not unrelated to the verse in which it is both described and inscribed. The beauty as well as difficulty of imitating abstractions and animals alike (“this soul, that bird, and fish”) should galvanize readers to be steadfast in keeping their sights firmly above the earthly fray.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
35Seest thou this Horizentall
Physical Note
vertical strike-through
Birds
whoſe Eyes
Seest thou
Gloss Note
perhaps the manucodiat or bird of paradise, which Pulter invokes elsewhere (see “The Manucodiats” [Emblem 5] [Poem 71]). Her account may draw on Simon Goulart’s A Learned Summary Upon the Famous Poem of William of Saluste Lord of Bartas, where the birds are described as being “remain[ing] always in the air” and even as having “no feet” (London, 1621), 1.241; the fact that they are always flying might explain Pulter’s epithet of “horizontal.”
this horizontal bird
, whose eyes
2
Are ffixt immoveable upon the Skies
Are fixed, immovable, upon the skies,
3
Though Night obſcures the Raidient Delias Rayes
Though night obscures the radiant
Gloss Note
Apollo’s, the sun god’s; for a figure usually called Delius (so named because he was from the island of Delos)
Delia’s
rays,
4
Though Clowds doe muffle his bright face a Dayes
Though clouds do muffle his bright face
Gloss Note
in the daytime
adays
?
5
Whether Shee Goes, or feeds, or breeds, or flyes
Whether she goes, or feeds, or breeds, or flies,
6
Yet Still to Heaven Shee Roles her longing Eyes
Yet still to Heav’n she rolls her longing eyes.
7
Soe doth the Sun ffiſh whoſe fair Eyes are ffixt
So doth the
Gloss Note
A number of fish species (called stargazers) have eyes atop their heads; others, sunfish, bask on their sides near the surface and so appear to stare at the sky. Pulter’s account here may draw on that of Goulart’s summary of Du Bartas (cited above), on the gaping fish, whose Greek name means “beholding the Heaven, because he hath two eyes planted above his head” (1.221).
sunfish
, whose fair eyes are fixed
8
On Heaven alone, her love Sure is Unmixt
On Heav’n alone; her love sure is
Gloss Note
pure, undiluted
unmixed
,
9
Although the Sea Works high and billows Swell
Although the sea works high, and billows swell
10
Almost to Heaven, then down as low as Hell
Almost to Heav’n, then down as low as Hell.
11
Though Hurricanians make the Welkin Roar
Though
Gloss Note
seemingly, hurricanes
hurricanians
make the
Gloss Note
sky
welkin
roar,
12
And Marriners their Woefull wracks deplore
And mariners their woeful
Gloss Note
wrecked ships
wracks
Gloss Note
lament
deplore
,
13
Yet Shee is Still the Same Shee was before
Yet she is still the same she was before.
14
Even Soe thoſe Souls whoſe hopes and Joy’s above
E’en so those souls whose hopes and joys above
15
Are onely plac’d, Reverberates that Love
Are only placed,
Gloss Note
sends back, returns
reverberates
that love
16
To Heaven from whence they had Iradiation
To Heav’n from whence they had
Gloss Note
a beaming forth of spiritual light
irradiation
,
17
Performing Soe the end of their Creation
Performing so the
Gloss Note
purpose
end
of their creation.
18
Soe imitate this Soul, that Bird and ffish
So imitate this soul, that bird, and fish,
19
And though things Anſwer not thy hopes or Wiſh
And though things answer not thy hopes or wish,
20
Yet look towards Heaven, on God alone depend
Yet look towards Heav’n, on God alone depend:
21
Hee will thy Suffrings medigate or End
He will thy suff’rings mitigate or end.
22
And trust not ffortune, nor her Amorous Smiles
And trust not Fortune, nor her amorous smiles;
23
ffor when Shee Courts us most Shee most beguils
For when she courts us most, she most
Gloss Note
deceives; disappoints, foils
beguiles
.
24
Nor fear her ffrowns for there is one on high
Nor fear her frowns, for there is one on high
25
At whoſe bright footstool ffate and ffortune lie
At whose bright footstool Fate and Fortune lie:
26
To him alone to him for Comfort fflie.
To Him alone, to Him for comfort
Gloss Note
flee
fly
.
ascending straight line
X (Close panel) All Notes
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Amplified Edition

 Editorial note

Elemental Edition

 Headnote

A footless bird and upturned fish eyes are the unlikely sources of inspiration in this emblem. The unique anatomy (imaginary or not) of two obscure creatures enables apparently spiritual behavior in them which the poet proffers as a model for her readers. The close parallels between this poem’s counsel to constancy and that in many other items in Pulter’s manuscript, far from being a sign of redundancy, is in fact thematically sound in a poem about the resounding virtue of each creature remaining “the same she was before.” However grounded it might be in biology, such a rehearsal is also construed here as a mimetic performance, an art form not unrelated to the verse in which it is both described and inscribed. The beauty as well as difficulty of imitating abstractions and animals alike (“this soul, that bird, and fish”) should galvanize readers to be steadfast in keeping their sights firmly above the earthly fray.
Amplified Edition

 Headnote

Transcription
Line number 1

 Physical note

vertical strike-through
Elemental Edition
Line number 1

 Gloss note

perhaps the manucodiat or bird of paradise, which Pulter invokes elsewhere (see “The Manucodiats” [Emblem 5] [Poem 71]). Her account may draw on Simon Goulart’s A Learned Summary Upon the Famous Poem of William of Saluste Lord of Bartas, where the birds are described as being “remain[ing] always in the air” and even as having “no feet” (London, 1621), 1.241; the fact that they are always flying might explain Pulter’s epithet of “horizontal.”
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Apollo’s, the sun god’s; for a figure usually called Delius (so named because he was from the island of Delos)
Elemental Edition
Line number 4

 Gloss note

in the daytime
Elemental Edition
Line number 7

 Gloss note

A number of fish species (called stargazers) have eyes atop their heads; others, sunfish, bask on their sides near the surface and so appear to stare at the sky. Pulter’s account here may draw on that of Goulart’s summary of Du Bartas (cited above), on the gaping fish, whose Greek name means “beholding the Heaven, because he hath two eyes planted above his head” (1.221).
Elemental Edition
Line number 8

 Gloss note

pure, undiluted
Elemental Edition
Line number 11

 Gloss note

seemingly, hurricanes
Elemental Edition
Line number 11

 Gloss note

sky
Elemental Edition
Line number 12

 Gloss note

wrecked ships
Elemental Edition
Line number 12

 Gloss note

lament
Elemental Edition
Line number 15

 Gloss note

sends back, returns
Elemental Edition
Line number 16

 Gloss note

a beaming forth of spiritual light
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

purpose
Elemental Edition
Line number 23

 Gloss note

deceives; disappoints, foils
Elemental Edition
Line number 26

 Gloss note

flee
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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