The Stately Unicorn (Emblem 14)

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The Stately Unicorn (Emblem 14)

Poem #80

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
  • Website designed by Sergei Kalugin, Northwestern University
  • IT project consultation by Josh Honn, Northwestern University
  • Project sponsored by Northwestern University, Brock University, and University of Leeds
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Line number 1

 Physical note

preceding poem occupies first third of page, followed by blank third; poem begins in bottom third
Line number 2

 Physical note

appears written over earlier word, possibly “more”
Line number 20

 Physical note

“b” possibly written over other letters
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Transcription
Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 14]
The Stately Unicorn
(Emblem 14)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Even the most powerful creatures are subject to seduction. This emblem unites the legendary unicorn (whose ability to purify poisonous waters grants him tremendous authority) with the biblical figures of the physically powerful Samson and wise Solomon, as creatures who risk becoming enslaved by the worldly allurements signified, quite conventionally, by women. Using these stories, the speaker feels empowered to address an imagined public audience of “gallants,” warning them of the danger of submitting to lust, fancy, or even alluring maidens.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
14
Physical Note
preceding poem occupies first third of page, followed by blank third; poem begins in bottom third
In
Affrica about the ffountain’s brink
In Africa, about the fountain’s
Gloss Note
edge
brink
2
Where Beast Aſſemble,
Physical Note
appears written over earlier word, possibly “more”
None
p:ſumes to drink
Where beasts assemble, none presumes to drink
3
Untill they See the Stately Unicorn
Until they see the stately
Gloss Note
A mythical animal whose single horn was reputed to possess medicinal or magical properties, especially in purifying poisons; according to legend, only a virgin could capture it.
unicorn
,
4
Who Stirs the Poyſonous Waters w:th his Horn
Who stirs the poisonous waters with his horn;
5
Then with Extended Jaws they drink their ffill
Then, with extended jaws, they drink their fill:
6
Thus hee the fforrest Governeth at his Will
Thus he the forest governeth at his will.
Hee

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
7
Hee Scorns all Huntsmen, who can never take
He scorns all huntsmen, who can never take
8
This Gallant Beast till they a Mayden make
This
Gloss Note
brave, gorgeous
gallant
beast, till they a maiden make
9
To Sit where hee doth haunt, him to allure
To sit where he doth haunt, him to allure;
10
ffor in her lap hee’l lie and Sleep Secure
For in her lap he’ll lie and sleep secure.
11
Thus hee that Scorn’d his Potents Enemie
Thus he that scorned his
Gloss Note
most potent, strongest
potentest
enemy
12
Is now inſlav’d by A Virgins Eye
Is now enslavéd by a virgin’s eye.
13
Soe Sampſon though Enabled from above
So
Gloss Note
See Judges 13-16; a biblical Nazrite who possessed Herculean strength, he killed one thousand Philistines with the jaw bone of an ass; Delilah seduced and betrayed him by revealing the source of his strength (his hair). After being captured and blinded by his enemies, he was put to work in a mill before later regaining his strength.
Samson
, though enabled from above,
14
ffound Death, and Ruin, from his Wanton Love
Found death and ruin from his wanton love;
15
Hee that a Thouſand Slaughterd with a Jaw
He that a thousand slaughtered with a jaw,
16
Beeing Blind and Captive, in A Mill did draw
Being blind and captive in a mill did
Gloss Note
work to move objects
draw
.
17
Soe Solloman allur’d by various Love
So
Gloss Note
see Kings 11:1-4; biblical king of Israel whose numerous foreign wives turned his heart toward idolatry (the worship of material beings made of earthly elements, or “dust”)
Solomon
, allured by various
Gloss Note
loves
love
,
18
Did leave the True and Glorious God above
Did leave the true and glorious God above
19
To Worſhip thoſe whoſe ffabrick is of Dust
To worship those whose fabric is of
Gloss Note
earth
dust
;
20
The Wiſest King was thus inſlavd
Physical Note
“b” possibly written over other letters
by
Lust
The wisest king was thus enslaved by lust.
21
The Strongest and the Wiſest thus you See
The strongest and the wisest thus you see,
22
ffoold by their stre^nght and Wiſdome often bee
Fooled by their strength and wisdom often be.
23
Then let all Youthfull Gallants warning take
Then let all youthful
Gloss Note
amorous men
gallants
warning take:
24
To chooſe by Reaſon not for ffancies Sake.
To choose by reason, not
Gloss Note
for a whim; for an amorous inclination or love
for fancy’s sake
.
horizontal straight line
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

Even the most powerful creatures are subject to seduction. This emblem unites the legendary unicorn (whose ability to purify poisonous waters grants him tremendous authority) with the biblical figures of the physically powerful Samson and wise Solomon, as creatures who risk becoming enslaved by the worldly allurements signified, quite conventionally, by women. Using these stories, the speaker feels empowered to address an imagined public audience of “gallants,” warning them of the danger of submitting to lust, fancy, or even alluring maidens.
Line number 1

 Gloss note

edge
Line number 3

 Gloss note

A mythical animal whose single horn was reputed to possess medicinal or magical properties, especially in purifying poisons; according to legend, only a virgin could capture it.
Line number 8

 Gloss note

brave, gorgeous
Line number 11

 Gloss note

most potent, strongest
Line number 13

 Gloss note

See Judges 13-16; a biblical Nazrite who possessed Herculean strength, he killed one thousand Philistines with the jaw bone of an ass; Delilah seduced and betrayed him by revealing the source of his strength (his hair). After being captured and blinded by his enemies, he was put to work in a mill before later regaining his strength.
Line number 16

 Gloss note

work to move objects
Line number 17

 Gloss note

see Kings 11:1-4; biblical king of Israel whose numerous foreign wives turned his heart toward idolatry (the worship of material beings made of earthly elements, or “dust”)
Line number 17

 Gloss note

loves
Line number 19

 Gloss note

earth
Line number 23

 Gloss note

amorous men
Line number 24

 Gloss note

for a whim; for an amorous inclination or love
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 14]
The Stately Unicorn
(Emblem 14)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Even the most powerful creatures are subject to seduction. This emblem unites the legendary unicorn (whose ability to purify poisonous waters grants him tremendous authority) with the biblical figures of the physically powerful Samson and wise Solomon, as creatures who risk becoming enslaved by the worldly allurements signified, quite conventionally, by women. Using these stories, the speaker feels empowered to address an imagined public audience of “gallants,” warning them of the danger of submitting to lust, fancy, or even alluring maidens.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
14
Physical Note
preceding poem occupies first third of page, followed by blank third; poem begins in bottom third
In
Affrica about the ffountain’s brink
In Africa, about the fountain’s
Gloss Note
edge
brink
2
Where Beast Aſſemble,
Physical Note
appears written over earlier word, possibly “more”
None
p:ſumes to drink
Where beasts assemble, none presumes to drink
3
Untill they See the Stately Unicorn
Until they see the stately
Gloss Note
A mythical animal whose single horn was reputed to possess medicinal or magical properties, especially in purifying poisons; according to legend, only a virgin could capture it.
unicorn
,
4
Who Stirs the Poyſonous Waters w:th his Horn
Who stirs the poisonous waters with his horn;
5
Then with Extended Jaws they drink their ffill
Then, with extended jaws, they drink their fill:
6
Thus hee the fforrest Governeth at his Will
Thus he the forest governeth at his will.
Hee

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
7
Hee Scorns all Huntsmen, who can never take
He scorns all huntsmen, who can never take
8
This Gallant Beast till they a Mayden make
This
Gloss Note
brave, gorgeous
gallant
beast, till they a maiden make
9
To Sit where hee doth haunt, him to allure
To sit where he doth haunt, him to allure;
10
ffor in her lap hee’l lie and Sleep Secure
For in her lap he’ll lie and sleep secure.
11
Thus hee that Scorn’d his Potents Enemie
Thus he that scorned his
Gloss Note
most potent, strongest
potentest
enemy
12
Is now inſlav’d by A Virgins Eye
Is now enslavéd by a virgin’s eye.
13
Soe Sampſon though Enabled from above
So
Gloss Note
See Judges 13-16; a biblical Nazrite who possessed Herculean strength, he killed one thousand Philistines with the jaw bone of an ass; Delilah seduced and betrayed him by revealing the source of his strength (his hair). After being captured and blinded by his enemies, he was put to work in a mill before later regaining his strength.
Samson
, though enabled from above,
14
ffound Death, and Ruin, from his Wanton Love
Found death and ruin from his wanton love;
15
Hee that a Thouſand Slaughterd with a Jaw
He that a thousand slaughtered with a jaw,
16
Beeing Blind and Captive, in A Mill did draw
Being blind and captive in a mill did
Gloss Note
work to move objects
draw
.
17
Soe Solloman allur’d by various Love
So
Gloss Note
see Kings 11:1-4; biblical king of Israel whose numerous foreign wives turned his heart toward idolatry (the worship of material beings made of earthly elements, or “dust”)
Solomon
, allured by various
Gloss Note
loves
love
,
18
Did leave the True and Glorious God above
Did leave the true and glorious God above
19
To Worſhip thoſe whoſe ffabrick is of Dust
To worship those whose fabric is of
Gloss Note
earth
dust
;
20
The Wiſest King was thus inſlavd
Physical Note
“b” possibly written over other letters
by
Lust
The wisest king was thus enslaved by lust.
21
The Strongest and the Wiſest thus you See
The strongest and the wisest thus you see,
22
ffoold by their stre^nght and Wiſdome often bee
Fooled by their strength and wisdom often be.
23
Then let all Youthfull Gallants warning take
Then let all youthful
Gloss Note
amorous men
gallants
warning take:
24
To chooſe by Reaſon not for ffancies Sake.
To choose by reason, not
Gloss Note
for a whim; for an amorous inclination or love
for fancy’s sake
.
horizontal straight line
X (Close panel) All Notes
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Amplified Edition

 Editorial note

Elemental Edition

 Headnote

Even the most powerful creatures are subject to seduction. This emblem unites the legendary unicorn (whose ability to purify poisonous waters grants him tremendous authority) with the biblical figures of the physically powerful Samson and wise Solomon, as creatures who risk becoming enslaved by the worldly allurements signified, quite conventionally, by women. Using these stories, the speaker feels empowered to address an imagined public audience of “gallants,” warning them of the danger of submitting to lust, fancy, or even alluring maidens.
Amplified Edition

 Headnote

Transcription
Line number 1

 Physical note

preceding poem occupies first third of page, followed by blank third; poem begins in bottom third
Elemental Edition
Line number 1

 Gloss note

edge
Transcription
Line number 2

 Physical note

appears written over earlier word, possibly “more”
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

A mythical animal whose single horn was reputed to possess medicinal or magical properties, especially in purifying poisons; according to legend, only a virgin could capture it.
Elemental Edition
Line number 8

 Gloss note

brave, gorgeous
Elemental Edition
Line number 11

 Gloss note

most potent, strongest
Elemental Edition
Line number 13

 Gloss note

See Judges 13-16; a biblical Nazrite who possessed Herculean strength, he killed one thousand Philistines with the jaw bone of an ass; Delilah seduced and betrayed him by revealing the source of his strength (his hair). After being captured and blinded by his enemies, he was put to work in a mill before later regaining his strength.
Elemental Edition
Line number 16

 Gloss note

work to move objects
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

see Kings 11:1-4; biblical king of Israel whose numerous foreign wives turned his heart toward idolatry (the worship of material beings made of earthly elements, or “dust”)
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

loves
Elemental Edition
Line number 19

 Gloss note

earth
Transcription
Line number 20

 Physical note

“b” possibly written over other letters
Elemental Edition
Line number 23

 Gloss note

amorous men
Elemental Edition
Line number 24

 Gloss note

for a whim; for an amorous inclination or love
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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