Must I Thus Ever Interdicted Be

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Must I Thus Ever Interdicted Be

Poem #55

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
  • Website designed by Sergei Kalugin, Northwestern University
  • IT project consultation by Josh Honn, Northwestern University
  • Project sponsored by Northwestern University, Brock University, and University of Leeds
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Line number 18

 Physical note

in different hand from main scribe
Line number 18

 Physical note

first punctuation likely a period, changed to exclamation mark by lighter ink. Reverse of page blank.
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Transcription
Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Untitled]
Must I Thus Ever Interdicted Be
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
In tense, terse rhyming tercets, the speaker objects to her interdiction (or prohibition) from religious “comforts.” She complains that God restrains his “ordinances,” but it may be that her all-too-human fellows had a hand in the matter: Elizabeth Clarke has argued that the vicar of Pulter’s church may not have shared her sense of how to celebrate Communion, at a time when such matters divided a nation at war (115). So little or so much may have been enough to keep Pulter from attending church; and, if so, may have been yet another cause of the confinement she laments in other poems. Here, too, she seeks the restoration of the privilege of moving freely, as birds do, in God’s “sacred temple”: whether an actual church, membership therein, or more abstractly, creation as a whole. Until then, she seeks spiritual sustenance, possibly in such complaints as this one, the earthly form of the “hallelujahs” she promises one day to proffer in return for God’s pardon and pity.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
Must I thus ever interdicted bee
Must I thus ever
Gloss Note
forbidden or restrained from something; in the church, cut off from offices or privileges
interdicted
be,
2
My Gracious God to thee and onely thee
My gracious God? To Thee and only Thee
3
I will complain pardon and pitty mee
I will complain: pardon and pity me.
4
Have I thy Sacred Pledges took in vain
Have I Thy
Gloss Note
possibly a reference to marriage vows, or others associated with being a good Christian
sacred pledges
took in vain,
5
Or Heard thy Bleſſed word applauſ to gain
Or heard Thy blessed word applause to gain,
6
That thou dost thus thine Ordinances re^strain
That Thou dost thus Thine
Gloss Note
authoritative decrees, plans, or arrangements; religious observances, such as the sacraments
ordinances
restrain?
7
If it bee Soe thy mercy I implore
If it be so, Thy mercy I implore,
8
To lay my Sins upon my Saviours Score
Gloss Note
To let Christ take on the weight of her sins, in his role as redeemer with God of sinful humanity
To lay my sins upon my Savior’s score
9
And mee unto thy Church again Restore
And me unto Thy church again restore.
10
The wanton Sparrow and the Chaster Dove
The
Gloss Note
The sparrow was frequently associated with lust in other texts of the period, such as An History of the Wonderful Things of Nature, which calls the sparrow “the lust fullest almost of all Birds” (Joannes Jonstonus,1657, p. 190).
wanton sparrow
and the
Gloss Note
The turtledove was understood to mate for life.
chaster dove
11
Within thy Sacred Temple ffreely move
Within Thy sacred
Critical Note
The “temple” here is as apt to be the created world (“sacred” because God-given) as it is to refer to a church (where birds might also be found).
temple
freely move;
12
But I ay mee am kept from what I Love
But I (ay me!) am kept from what I love.
13
O let thy Spirit my Sad Soul Suſtain
O, let Thy Spirit my sad soul sustain
14
Untill thoſe comforts I doe Reatain
Until those comforts I do reattain;
15
Then let mee never part with them again
Then let me never part with them again
16
Untill my Captivated Soul takes wing
Until my captivated soul takes wing;
17
Then will I Halelujahs ever Sing
Then will I
Gloss Note
exclamations or songs in praise of God
hallelujahs
ever sing
18
To thee my Gracious
Physical Note
in different hand from main scribe
\God \
and Glorious
Physical Note
first punctuation likely a period, changed to exclamation mark by lighter ink. Reverse of page blank.
King
!
To Thee, my gracious God and glorious king.
curled line
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

In tense, terse rhyming tercets, the speaker objects to her interdiction (or prohibition) from religious “comforts.” She complains that God restrains his “ordinances,” but it may be that her all-too-human fellows had a hand in the matter: Elizabeth Clarke has argued that the vicar of Pulter’s church may not have shared her sense of how to celebrate Communion, at a time when such matters divided a nation at war (115). So little or so much may have been enough to keep Pulter from attending church; and, if so, may have been yet another cause of the confinement she laments in other poems. Here, too, she seeks the restoration of the privilege of moving freely, as birds do, in God’s “sacred temple”: whether an actual church, membership therein, or more abstractly, creation as a whole. Until then, she seeks spiritual sustenance, possibly in such complaints as this one, the earthly form of the “hallelujahs” she promises one day to proffer in return for God’s pardon and pity.
Line number 1

 Gloss note

forbidden or restrained from something; in the church, cut off from offices or privileges
Line number 4

 Gloss note

possibly a reference to marriage vows, or others associated with being a good Christian
Line number 6

 Gloss note

authoritative decrees, plans, or arrangements; religious observances, such as the sacraments
Line number 8

 Gloss note

To let Christ take on the weight of her sins, in his role as redeemer with God of sinful humanity
Line number 10

 Gloss note

The sparrow was frequently associated with lust in other texts of the period, such as An History of the Wonderful Things of Nature, which calls the sparrow “the lust fullest almost of all Birds” (Joannes Jonstonus,1657, p. 190).
Line number 10

 Gloss note

The turtledove was understood to mate for life.
Line number 11

 Critical note

The “temple” here is as apt to be the created world (“sacred” because God-given) as it is to refer to a church (where birds might also be found).
Line number 17

 Gloss note

exclamations or songs in praise of God
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Untitled]
Must I Thus Ever Interdicted Be
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
In tense, terse rhyming tercets, the speaker objects to her interdiction (or prohibition) from religious “comforts.” She complains that God restrains his “ordinances,” but it may be that her all-too-human fellows had a hand in the matter: Elizabeth Clarke has argued that the vicar of Pulter’s church may not have shared her sense of how to celebrate Communion, at a time when such matters divided a nation at war (115). So little or so much may have been enough to keep Pulter from attending church; and, if so, may have been yet another cause of the confinement she laments in other poems. Here, too, she seeks the restoration of the privilege of moving freely, as birds do, in God’s “sacred temple”: whether an actual church, membership therein, or more abstractly, creation as a whole. Until then, she seeks spiritual sustenance, possibly in such complaints as this one, the earthly form of the “hallelujahs” she promises one day to proffer in return for God’s pardon and pity.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
Must I thus ever interdicted bee
Must I thus ever
Gloss Note
forbidden or restrained from something; in the church, cut off from offices or privileges
interdicted
be,
2
My Gracious God to thee and onely thee
My gracious God? To Thee and only Thee
3
I will complain pardon and pitty mee
I will complain: pardon and pity me.
4
Have I thy Sacred Pledges took in vain
Have I Thy
Gloss Note
possibly a reference to marriage vows, or others associated with being a good Christian
sacred pledges
took in vain,
5
Or Heard thy Bleſſed word applauſ to gain
Or heard Thy blessed word applause to gain,
6
That thou dost thus thine Ordinances re^strain
That Thou dost thus Thine
Gloss Note
authoritative decrees, plans, or arrangements; religious observances, such as the sacraments
ordinances
restrain?
7
If it bee Soe thy mercy I implore
If it be so, Thy mercy I implore,
8
To lay my Sins upon my Saviours Score
Gloss Note
To let Christ take on the weight of her sins, in his role as redeemer with God of sinful humanity
To lay my sins upon my Savior’s score
9
And mee unto thy Church again Restore
And me unto Thy church again restore.
10
The wanton Sparrow and the Chaster Dove
The
Gloss Note
The sparrow was frequently associated with lust in other texts of the period, such as An History of the Wonderful Things of Nature, which calls the sparrow “the lust fullest almost of all Birds” (Joannes Jonstonus,1657, p. 190).
wanton sparrow
and the
Gloss Note
The turtledove was understood to mate for life.
chaster dove
11
Within thy Sacred Temple ffreely move
Within Thy sacred
Critical Note
The “temple” here is as apt to be the created world (“sacred” because God-given) as it is to refer to a church (where birds might also be found).
temple
freely move;
12
But I ay mee am kept from what I Love
But I (ay me!) am kept from what I love.
13
O let thy Spirit my Sad Soul Suſtain
O, let Thy Spirit my sad soul sustain
14
Untill thoſe comforts I doe Reatain
Until those comforts I do reattain;
15
Then let mee never part with them again
Then let me never part with them again
16
Untill my Captivated Soul takes wing
Until my captivated soul takes wing;
17
Then will I Halelujahs ever Sing
Then will I
Gloss Note
exclamations or songs in praise of God
hallelujahs
ever sing
18
To thee my Gracious
Physical Note
in different hand from main scribe
\God \
and Glorious
Physical Note
first punctuation likely a period, changed to exclamation mark by lighter ink. Reverse of page blank.
King
!
To Thee, my gracious God and glorious king.
curled line
X (Close panel) All Notes
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Amplified Edition

 Editorial note

Elemental Edition

 Headnote

In tense, terse rhyming tercets, the speaker objects to her interdiction (or prohibition) from religious “comforts.” She complains that God restrains his “ordinances,” but it may be that her all-too-human fellows had a hand in the matter: Elizabeth Clarke has argued that the vicar of Pulter’s church may not have shared her sense of how to celebrate Communion, at a time when such matters divided a nation at war (115). So little or so much may have been enough to keep Pulter from attending church; and, if so, may have been yet another cause of the confinement she laments in other poems. Here, too, she seeks the restoration of the privilege of moving freely, as birds do, in God’s “sacred temple”: whether an actual church, membership therein, or more abstractly, creation as a whole. Until then, she seeks spiritual sustenance, possibly in such complaints as this one, the earthly form of the “hallelujahs” she promises one day to proffer in return for God’s pardon and pity.
Amplified Edition

 Headnote

Elemental Edition
Line number 1

 Gloss note

forbidden or restrained from something; in the church, cut off from offices or privileges
Elemental Edition
Line number 4

 Gloss note

possibly a reference to marriage vows, or others associated with being a good Christian
Elemental Edition
Line number 6

 Gloss note

authoritative decrees, plans, or arrangements; religious observances, such as the sacraments
Elemental Edition
Line number 8

 Gloss note

To let Christ take on the weight of her sins, in his role as redeemer with God of sinful humanity
Elemental Edition
Line number 10

 Gloss note

The sparrow was frequently associated with lust in other texts of the period, such as An History of the Wonderful Things of Nature, which calls the sparrow “the lust fullest almost of all Birds” (Joannes Jonstonus,1657, p. 190).
Elemental Edition
Line number 10

 Gloss note

The turtledove was understood to mate for life.
Elemental Edition
Line number 11

 Critical note

The “temple” here is as apt to be the created world (“sacred” because God-given) as it is to refer to a church (where birds might also be found).
Elemental Edition
Line number 17

 Gloss note

exclamations or songs in praise of God
Transcription
Line number 18

 Physical note

in different hand from main scribe
Transcription
Line number 18

 Physical note

first punctuation likely a period, changed to exclamation mark by lighter ink. Reverse of page blank.
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
ManuscriptX (Close panel)
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