Mark But Those Hogs (Emblem 34)

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Mark But Those Hogs (Emblem 34)

Poem #99

Original Source

Hester Pulter, Poems breathed forth by the nobel Hadassas, University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

Versions

  • Facsimile of manuscript: Photographs provided by University of Leeds, Brotherton Collection

  • Transcription of manuscript: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.
  • Elemental edition: By Leah Knight and Wendy Wall.

How to cite these versions

Conventions for these editions

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

  • Created by Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
  • Encoded by Katherine Poland, Matthew Taylor, Elizabeth Chou, and Emily Andrey, Northwestern University
  • Website designed by Sergei Kalugin, Northwestern University
  • IT project consultation by Josh Honn, Northwestern University
  • Project sponsored by Northwestern University, Brock University, and University of Leeds
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X (Close panel)Notes: Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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Transcription

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 34]
Mark But Those Hogs
(Emblem 34)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Which would you rather be: hog or dove? Pulter makes the choice even easier than it might first seem with her contrasting portraits of the dietary habits of each creature. Grunting hogs root for nuts with their snouts in the dirt, never even thinking to thank those who made them fall to the ground in the first place, while turtledoves alternate between dainty sips, grateful prayers, and thoughts of still higher things than mere food and drink. But then comes the twist: doves, though innocent, are often sacrificial victims, while hogs, through no virtue of their own, have the good fortune to be banned from the altar. This is the moral quandary on which Pulter’s final invocation turns: knowing all this, now which would you rather be? She claims the choice remains clear.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
34Mark but those Hogs w:ch underneath yond tree
Gloss Note
Consider only, or just notice
Mark but
those hogs which, underneath
Gloss Note
that (implying something within view)
yon
tree
2
Nuſling and eating Acorns, you may See
Gloss Note
digging or rooting up with the snout
Nuzzling
and eating acorns, you may see:
3
they never cast an eye to thoſe which Shake
Gloss Note
Eardley notes that the shaking of acorns from trees was a common practice among swine farmers.
They never cast an eye to those which shake;
4
Soe thankles People doe Gods bleſſings take
So thankless people do God’s blessings take
5
And never doe his bounteous Love Adore
And never do His bounteous love adore,
6
But Swiniſhly Root on and Grunt for more
But swinishly root on and grunt for more;
7
Soe gripeing Worldlings Still their Wealthe increase
So
Gloss Note
someone who is grasping or greedy and dedicated to earthly (instead of heavenly) pleasures and interests
griping worldlings
still their wealth increase
8
And onely pray their bags may Rest in peace
And only pray their
Gloss Note
money bags
bags
may rest in peace;
9
Soe Grumbling ffarmers Still turn up the Earth
So grumbling farmers still turn up the earth,
10
ffearing that every Shower will cauſ a Dearth
Gloss Note
The misguided farmers (from the line above) plow their fields, but are overly concerned that rain will kill the crops) rather than appreciating the nourishing rain from heaven.
Fearing that every shower will cause a dearth.
11
Even Soe voluptius Gallants dance along
Even so
Gloss Note
“gallants” are men and women of fashion and pleasure who are inclined to “voluptuous” ease, luxury, and gratification of the senses
voluptuous gallants
dance along,
12
Their meetings ending in A drunken Song
Their meetings ending in a drunken song.
13
When Like the Chast & conſtant turtle Dove
When, like the chaste and constant turtledove,
14
Which takes a Sip then throws her eyes above
Which takes a sip then throws her eyes above,
15
Gods Children here but Sip of Terren Toys
God’s children here but sip of
Gloss Note
“toys” are amorous sports; trumpery, rubbish, playthings, amusements; “terrene” can mean earthly, secular, temporal, material, or human
terrene toys
,
16
Then turn their thoughts to true Celestiall Joys
Then turn their thoughts to true celestial joys,
17
Like Innocent Doves they often victims die
Like innocent doves, they often victims die,
18
When Hogs his Sacred Alter come not Nie
When
Critical Note
Eardley notes the biblical allusions in this line and the one above: “Isa. 66:3 states that the sacrificing of swine pollutes the sacred church and is therefore an abomination. Here this is compared with the sacrifice of the doves in Luke 2:24, which provides a prefiguration of the death of Christ.”
hogs His sacred altar come not nigh
.
19
Then let the Reader trie, which best hee loves
Then let the reader
Gloss Note
sift or distinguish; ascertain, find out (i.e., by effort or experiment, effort, experience); test, put to proof
try
which best he loves
20
To imitate, baſe Hogs or Turtle Doves
To imitate: base hogs or turtledoves.
21
But as for mee ’tis my Souls Sole deſire
But as for me, ’tis my soul’s sole desire
22
Like Spotles Doves to live and Soe expire.
Like
Gloss Note
innocent, free from sin, pure
spotless
doves to live and so expire.
horizontal straight line
X (Close panel)Notes: Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

 Headnote

Which would you rather be: hog or dove? Pulter makes the choice even easier than it might first seem with her contrasting portraits of the dietary habits of each creature. Grunting hogs root for nuts with their snouts in the dirt, never even thinking to thank those who made them fall to the ground in the first place, while turtledoves alternate between dainty sips, grateful prayers, and thoughts of still higher things than mere food and drink. But then comes the twist: doves, though innocent, are often sacrificial victims, while hogs, through no virtue of their own, have the good fortune to be banned from the altar. This is the moral quandary on which Pulter’s final invocation turns: knowing all this, now which would you rather be? She claims the choice remains clear.
Line number 1

 Gloss note

Consider only, or just notice
Line number 1

 Gloss note

that (implying something within view)
Line number 2

 Gloss note

digging or rooting up with the snout
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Eardley notes that the shaking of acorns from trees was a common practice among swine farmers.
Line number 7

 Gloss note

someone who is grasping or greedy and dedicated to earthly (instead of heavenly) pleasures and interests
Line number 8

 Gloss note

money bags
Line number 10

 Gloss note

The misguided farmers (from the line above) plow their fields, but are overly concerned that rain will kill the crops) rather than appreciating the nourishing rain from heaven.
Line number 11

 Gloss note

“gallants” are men and women of fashion and pleasure who are inclined to “voluptuous” ease, luxury, and gratification of the senses
Line number 15

 Gloss note

“toys” are amorous sports; trumpery, rubbish, playthings, amusements; “terrene” can mean earthly, secular, temporal, material, or human
Line number 18

 Critical note

Eardley notes the biblical allusions in this line and the one above: “Isa. 66:3 states that the sacrificing of swine pollutes the sacred church and is therefore an abomination. Here this is compared with the sacrifice of the doves in Luke 2:24, which provides a prefiguration of the death of Christ.”
Line number 19

 Gloss note

sift or distinguish; ascertain, find out (i.e., by effort or experiment, effort, experience); test, put to proof
Line number 22

 Gloss note

innocent, free from sin, pure
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
X (Close panel)Elemental Edition
Elemental Edition

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder

Facsimile Image Placeholder
[Emblem 34]
Mark But Those Hogs
(Emblem 34)
AE TITLE
In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
Which would you rather be: hog or dove? Pulter makes the choice even easier than it might first seem with her contrasting portraits of the dietary habits of each creature. Grunting hogs root for nuts with their snouts in the dirt, never even thinking to thank those who made them fall to the ground in the first place, while turtledoves alternate between dainty sips, grateful prayers, and thoughts of still higher things than mere food and drink. But then comes the twist: doves, though innocent, are often sacrificial victims, while hogs, through no virtue of their own, have the good fortune to be banned from the altar. This is the moral quandary on which Pulter’s final invocation turns: knowing all this, now which would you rather be? She claims the choice remains clear.

— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall


— Leah Knight and Wendy Wall
1
34Mark but those Hogs w:ch underneath yond tree
Gloss Note
Consider only, or just notice
Mark but
those hogs which, underneath
Gloss Note
that (implying something within view)
yon
tree
2
Nuſling and eating Acorns, you may See
Gloss Note
digging or rooting up with the snout
Nuzzling
and eating acorns, you may see:
3
they never cast an eye to thoſe which Shake
Gloss Note
Eardley notes that the shaking of acorns from trees was a common practice among swine farmers.
They never cast an eye to those which shake;
4
Soe thankles People doe Gods bleſſings take
So thankless people do God’s blessings take
5
And never doe his bounteous Love Adore
And never do His bounteous love adore,
6
But Swiniſhly Root on and Grunt for more
But swinishly root on and grunt for more;
7
Soe gripeing Worldlings Still their Wealthe increase
So
Gloss Note
someone who is grasping or greedy and dedicated to earthly (instead of heavenly) pleasures and interests
griping worldlings
still their wealth increase
8
And onely pray their bags may Rest in peace
And only pray their
Gloss Note
money bags
bags
may rest in peace;
9
Soe Grumbling ffarmers Still turn up the Earth
So grumbling farmers still turn up the earth,
10
ffearing that every Shower will cauſ a Dearth
Gloss Note
The misguided farmers (from the line above) plow their fields, but are overly concerned that rain will kill the crops) rather than appreciating the nourishing rain from heaven.
Fearing that every shower will cause a dearth.
11
Even Soe voluptius Gallants dance along
Even so
Gloss Note
“gallants” are men and women of fashion and pleasure who are inclined to “voluptuous” ease, luxury, and gratification of the senses
voluptuous gallants
dance along,
12
Their meetings ending in A drunken Song
Their meetings ending in a drunken song.
13
When Like the Chast & conſtant turtle Dove
When, like the chaste and constant turtledove,
14
Which takes a Sip then throws her eyes above
Which takes a sip then throws her eyes above,
15
Gods Children here but Sip of Terren Toys
God’s children here but sip of
Gloss Note
“toys” are amorous sports; trumpery, rubbish, playthings, amusements; “terrene” can mean earthly, secular, temporal, material, or human
terrene toys
,
16
Then turn their thoughts to true Celestiall Joys
Then turn their thoughts to true celestial joys,
17
Like Innocent Doves they often victims die
Like innocent doves, they often victims die,
18
When Hogs his Sacred Alter come not Nie
When
Critical Note
Eardley notes the biblical allusions in this line and the one above: “Isa. 66:3 states that the sacrificing of swine pollutes the sacred church and is therefore an abomination. Here this is compared with the sacrifice of the doves in Luke 2:24, which provides a prefiguration of the death of Christ.”
hogs His sacred altar come not nigh
.
19
Then let the Reader trie, which best hee loves
Then let the reader
Gloss Note
sift or distinguish; ascertain, find out (i.e., by effort or experiment, effort, experience); test, put to proof
try
which best he loves
20
To imitate, baſe Hogs or Turtle Doves
To imitate: base hogs or turtledoves.
21
But as for mee ’tis my Souls Sole deſire
But as for me, ’tis my soul’s sole desire
22
Like Spotles Doves to live and Soe expire.
Like
Gloss Note
innocent, free from sin, pure
spotless
doves to live and so expire.
horizontal straight line
X (Close panel) All Notes
Transcription

 Editorial note

In these transcriptions we preserve as many details of the original material, textual, and graphic properties of Hester Pulter’s manuscript verse as we have found practical. Whenever possible, for instance, original spelling, punctuation, capitalization, lineation, insertions, deletions, alterations, spacing between words and lines, and indentation are all maintained; abbreviations and brevigraphs are not expanded; and superscript and subscript representations are retained. See full conventions for the transcriptions here.
Elemental Edition

 Editorial note

The aim of the elemental edition is to make the poems accessible to the largest variety of readers, which involves modernizing spelling and punctuation as well as adding basic glosses. Spelling and punctuation reflect current standard American usage; punctuation highlights syntax which might otherwise be obscure. Outmoded but still familiar word forms (“thou,” “‘tis,” “hold’st”) are not modernized, and we do not modernize grammar when the sense remains legible. After a brief headnote aimed at offering a “way in” to the poem’s unique qualities and connections with other verse by Pulter or her contemporaries, the edition features a minimum of notes and interpretative framing to allow more immediate engagement with the poem. Glosses clarify synonyms or showcase various possible meanings in Pulter’s time. Other notes identify named people and places or clarify obscure material. We rely (without citation) primarily on the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the Oxford Reference database, and the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. When we rely on Alice Eardley’s edition of Pulter’s work, we cite her text generally (“Eardley”); other sources are cited in full. The result is an edition we consider a springboard for further work on Pulter’s poetry. See full conventions for this edition here.
Amplified Edition

 Editorial note

Elemental Edition

 Headnote

Which would you rather be: hog or dove? Pulter makes the choice even easier than it might first seem with her contrasting portraits of the dietary habits of each creature. Grunting hogs root for nuts with their snouts in the dirt, never even thinking to thank those who made them fall to the ground in the first place, while turtledoves alternate between dainty sips, grateful prayers, and thoughts of still higher things than mere food and drink. But then comes the twist: doves, though innocent, are often sacrificial victims, while hogs, through no virtue of their own, have the good fortune to be banned from the altar. This is the moral quandary on which Pulter’s final invocation turns: knowing all this, now which would you rather be? She claims the choice remains clear.
Amplified Edition

 Headnote

Elemental Edition
Line number 1

 Gloss note

Consider only, or just notice
Elemental Edition
Line number 1

 Gloss note

that (implying something within view)
Elemental Edition
Line number 2

 Gloss note

digging or rooting up with the snout
Elemental Edition
Line number 3

 Gloss note

Eardley notes that the shaking of acorns from trees was a common practice among swine farmers.
Elemental Edition
Line number 7

 Gloss note

someone who is grasping or greedy and dedicated to earthly (instead of heavenly) pleasures and interests
Elemental Edition
Line number 8

 Gloss note

money bags
Elemental Edition
Line number 10

 Gloss note

The misguided farmers (from the line above) plow their fields, but are overly concerned that rain will kill the crops) rather than appreciating the nourishing rain from heaven.
Elemental Edition
Line number 11

 Gloss note

“gallants” are men and women of fashion and pleasure who are inclined to “voluptuous” ease, luxury, and gratification of the senses
Elemental Edition
Line number 15

 Gloss note

“toys” are amorous sports; trumpery, rubbish, playthings, amusements; “terrene” can mean earthly, secular, temporal, material, or human
Elemental Edition
Line number 18

 Critical note

Eardley notes the biblical allusions in this line and the one above: “Isa. 66:3 states that the sacrificing of swine pollutes the sacred church and is therefore an abomination. Here this is compared with the sacrifice of the doves in Luke 2:24, which provides a prefiguration of the death of Christ.”
Elemental Edition
Line number 19

 Gloss note

sift or distinguish; ascertain, find out (i.e., by effort or experiment, effort, experience); test, put to proof
Elemental Edition
Line number 22

 Gloss note

innocent, free from sin, pure
Sorry, but there are no notes associated with any currently displayed witness.
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